Farman F.212

Farman F.212



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Farman F.212

The Farman F.212 was an improved version of the F.211 four-engined heavy bomber. The main change was the use of 350hp Gnome-Rhone 7Kds radial engines, increasing the total available horsepower from 1,200hp to 1,400hp and the top speed from 137mph to 152mph. There were also a series of more minor changes. The F.212 carried the same defensive armament as the F.211, with twin 0.303in guns in nose and dorsal positions and a single 0.303in gun in a ventral position. The bomb load also rose, from 2,315lb on the F.211 to 3,086lb on the F.212. The F.212 was test flown from April 1934, two years after the F.211. By this date development had moved onto the F.220/ F.221 series, and the F.212 didn't enter production.


HistoryLink.org

Richard G. "Dick" Farman co-founded the Farman Brothers Pickle Company in Enumclaw with his brother Fred. They started with a small 10-acre cucumber farm and pickling operation in 1944 and grew it into a popular brand as “The King Pickle” in 13 Western states. Farman was also a star on the Washington State University Cougars football team in the late 1930s and played several seasons with the Redskins in the National Football League.

The Pick in Pickles

Dick Farman was born in Belmond, Nebraska, in 1916 and relocated as a child with his family to Kent, Washington. He worked in pickle factories during his high school and college years, and decided to get into the business after hanging up his Redskins helmet in 1944. He and his brother Fred established a cucumber farm in the family’s backyard in Enumclaw, and hired mechanic Don Grover in 1948 to develop new processing equipment.

In its early years, Farman Brothers annually packed and shipped 65 tons of pickles. The firm became renowned for its consistent quality and was purchased in the 1970s by Nalley Foods, which incited a consumer revolt when it considered dropping the Farman’s brand.

Nalley itself was purchased by AgriLink Foods, a marketing cooperative, in 1975, and the Farman’s name and its trademark “King Pickle” survived to grace seven million tons of pickles and relishes consumed by happy customers in 13 Western states in 2001.

On May 5, 2002, Dick Farman died at the age of 85.

Note: This article is part of Cultivating Washington, The History of Our State’s Food, Land, and People, which includes more agriculture-related content, vidoes, and curriculum.

For the History of Our State's Food, Land, and People curriculum, click here


Contents

Antiquity

During the Age of Heroes, the Farman kings used their longships to guard Fair Isle and the west coast of Westeros against ironborn reavers from the nearby Iron Islands. Α]

At some point Gylbert Farman successfully led the smallfolk of Fair Isle in rebellion against the ironborn. Erich V Harlaw, High King of the Iron Islands, eventually reconquered Fair Isle, but lost it when he grew old. Β]

During the coming of the Andals, Fair Isle was added to the Kingdom of the Rock when Tommen I Lannister raised a great fleet and married the last Farman king's daughter. Α]

Rhaena Targaryen

Princess Rhaena Targaryen sought refuge from King Maegor I Targaryen with Lord Marq Farman, Γ] but she eventually returned to the crownlands to wed the king. Δ] Rhaena returned to Fair Isle after the coronation of her brother, King Jaehaerys I Targaryen. Ε] Rhaena wed Marq's son, Androw Farman, in a small ceremony in 49 AC. Ζ] Elissa Farman, Androw's sister and a close friend of Rhaena, had sailed around Fair Isle when she was fourteen. ΐ] Once lord, Ser Franklyn Farman forced Rhaena and her companions to leave his island. ΐ]

Rhaena returned to Fair Isle during her search for the missing Aerea Targaryen. Because of Franklyn's poor treatment of Rhaena, King Jaehaerys I Targaryen did not visit Fair Isle during his royal progress to the westerlands in 55 AC. Η] The king eventually visited the island in 88 AC, after Lord Franklyn had died. ⎖]

The Red Kraken

Dalton Greyjoy, Lord of the Iron Islands, captured Fair Isle during the Dance of the Dragons. ⎗] Lady Johanna Lannister began construction of a fleet to retake the isle, but Dalton burned them in her shipyards. ⎘] After a victory at Kayce, Johanna sent Lord Prester, Lord Tarbeck, and Ser Erwin Lannister with a host to Fair Isle, but Dalton killed them after the westermen's fleet was ambushed by longships. ⎙]

Following Lord Alyn's attack during the Daughters' War, Lord Unwin Peake ordered Lord Alyn Velaryon to sail west and retake Fair Isle. ⎙] Dalton gathered hundreds of longships to Fair Isle and western ports in anticipation of Alyn Oakenfist's fleet. ⎚] After the Red Kraken was murdered by Tess at Faircastle, the ironborn fleet collapsed and returned to the Iron Islands. Fair Isle's smallfolk and remaining knights rose in rebellion, slaying the remaining ironborn. ⎛] ⎚]

Recent History

During the reign of Aerys I Targaryen, the ironborn raided Fair Isle, making off with half its worth. Ser Duncan the Tall and his squire, Prince Aegon Targaryen, considered aiding Lord Farman against Lord Dagon Greyjoy. ⎜] ⎜]

Sailing on Black Wind, Asha Greyjoy and Qarl the Maid visited Fair Isle and Lannisport during their voyage to the Arbor. ⎞]


Farman F.212 - History

Goings On: posted week of August 29, 2006


1. Ken Friedman, FF Alumn, new work on Fluxus, now online
2. Arturo Lindsay, FF Alumn, at Colgate Univ., Hamilton, NY, Oct. 20-21
3. Beth Lapides, FF Alumn, new book, publication date Nov. 11, 2006
4. Frank Moore, FF Alumn, at Burnt Ramen, Richmond, CA, Aug. 31
5. Susana Cook, FF Alumn, at www.nytheatre.com
6. Jacki Ochs, FF Alumn, at Museum of the City of NY, Sept. 11, 1 pm
7. Tim Miller, FF Alumn, end of Summer news and Fall highlights
8. Eddy Falconer, FF Alumn, at El Rio, San Francisco, Sept. 1, 8 pm
9. Maureen Connor, Laura Parnes, Barbara Pollack, Michael Smith, William Wegman, FF Alumns, at EFA Gallery, NY, Sept. 8, 6-8 pm
10. Irina Danilova, FF Alumn, at Pioneer Theater, NY, Sept. 5, 7 pm
11. William Scarbrough, FF Alumn, at Michaelis Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa, Sept. 5-29
12. Regina Vater, FF Alumn, Smithsonian oral history, now online
13. Robin Tewes, FF Alumn, at Pace University, Oct. 4, 11 am

1. Ken Friedman, FF Alumn, new work on Fluxus, now online

Fluxus historian Owen Smith and Fluxus artist Ken Friedman, FF Alumn, have developed a special double issue of the journal Visible Language on Fluxus, issues 39.3 and 40.1. The publishers of Visible Language have made a sampler from issue 40.1 available as a PDF file to Franklin Furnace readers. To get your copy of the sampler, please follow this link

(If you want to open through the link via Franklin Furnace's site please go to:
http://www.franklinfurnace.org/scholarly/scholarly.html and then click
RELATED TEXTS and then click VISIBLE LANGUAGE FLUXUS PREVIEW and then you get the introduction to the articles and a link that opens the PDF file.)

2. Arturo Lindsay, FF Alumn, at Colgate Univ., Hamilton, NY, Oct. 20-21

ART AND CULTURE OF THE YORUBA DIASPORA
Symposium examining African cultural expressions in the Americas
October 20-21, 2006
Colgate University, Hamilton, NY
The Yoruba people of Nigeria are the most numerous cultural group on the African continent. One in four Africans is a Yoruba, and it is believed that one in five people of African heritage is descended from Yoruba ancestors. This symposium examines the impact of Yoruba art and culture in the Americas. The keynote speaker, Robert Farris Thompson of Yale University, will address transatlantic art of Eshu, the Yoruba trickster divinity, on Friday, October 20th at 8:00 pm in 209 Lathrop Hall. Talks will continue from 9:30-5:00 on Saturday, October 21st, in Golden Auditorium in Little Hall. Participants include Sheila Walker (Spelman College), Babatunde Lawal (Virginia Commonwealth University), Moyo Okediji (University of Colorado), Chief Jimoh Buraimoh (artist, Nigeria and Atlanta), Marta Moreno Vega (Franklin H. Williams Caribbean Cultural Center/African Diaspora Institute Baruch College, CUNY), Marilyn Houlberg (School of the Art Institute of Chicago), and Arturo Lindsay of Spelman College (Distinguished Batza Family Chair, Colgate University, Fall 2006).

3. Beth Lapides, FF Alumn, new book, publication date Nov. 11, 2006

Did I Wake You?
Haikus for Modern Living
by Beth Lapides
1-933368-49-7, Publication Date: November 11, 2006 by Soft Skull Press
Humor/Poetry/Self-Help 5 x 6&prod 112 pp. 17 B&W illustrations $12.95

" Did I Wake You?" is a plugged-in, turned-on, funny enlightened guide to waking up 17 syllables at a time from alternative comedian Beth Lapides. A haiku collection, a humor book, a self-help and anti-self-help book all rolled into one, " Did I Wake You?" is easy reading for difficult people. Read it at your desk, in your bed, on the john or the Stairmaster - or anytime you need a lift.

Beth calls her haikus 'nano-literature', and her crystalline writing tells tiny stories that wake us up to the beauty, joy, wonder and quantum absurdity of life in the post-9/11 world. Beth's insights into spirituality and sex, sleeping and consciousness, Google and yoga fill chapters like "Dirty Optimism", "My Firewall Needs Work", and "Hollywood Math". (sample haikus below)

About the author:
Beth Lapides is a writer, performance artist and comic revolutionary who founded the legendary alternative comedy show Un-Cabaret. Her work has been published in the Los Angeles Times, Utne Reader, The Realist, LA Weekly, Premiere and FreshYarn.com and is now available in digital dowloads from Audible.com. She has been a commentator for NPR's All Things Considered and ABC Radio&rsquos Satellite Sisters and The Huffington Post. She has also been featured on many other TV and radio programs including the TodayShow, Politically Incorrect, NBC뭩 Dateline, E! True Hollywood Story, & Morning Edition.

Beth is the creator of the ground-breaking Un-Cabaret, a live LA-based comedy show which has also been produced by Comedy Central, Sirius Satellite Radio, HBO뭩 Comedy Arts Festival and Comedy World Radio (where Beth also hosted her own daily talk show). Her one-person shows have been presented by the ICA London, ICA Boston, The Kitchen, PS122, Highways, and many other venues. Her book and visual art has been seen at the Metropolitan Museum and in Spiderman 3, among other venues. Beth has received several performance and art grants from the NEA. Her career came full-circle when she played a performance artist on the HBO hit Sex and the City. ?br>
Her company, Un-Cabaret Multi-Media, has produced five critically-acclaimed comedy CD's, an award-winning website (uncabaret.com), comedy festivals, live events and ongoing shows including Say The Word ?a reading series, and The Other Network뾞 runaway hit screening series of the best un-aired TV pilots ever made. Beth also trains writers, performers and others at The Un-Cab Lab standup workshop.

Beth is outspoken and politically active, including producing and performing in a TV project for the ACLU and benefit CD with the Drug Policy Alliance. During the 1992 Presidential election, she ran a guerrilla campaign to make First Lady an elected position and was featured everywhere from CNN to Interview and People magazine. She got as many electoral votes as Ross Perot and spent millions less.

Ever conscious of the multi-dimensional nature of reality, Beth is launching "Did I Wake You?" across multiple media platforms. Her new one-person show about eviction, love, exile in the desert, and psychic healing will start workshop versions in the Fall. Also coming soon are ringtones, digital downloads, and a "Did I Wake You?" blog, featuring short prose pieces written by Beth and invited guests about wake-up calls they've experienced in their own life.

For more info, hi-res photos and audio (perfect for morning radio!) contact:

Greg Miller/Un-Cabaret [email protected] 760-327-4656
Kristin Pulkkinen/Soft Skull [email protected] 718-643-1599

4. Frank Moore, FF Alumn, at Burnt Ramen, Richmond, CA, Aug. 31

Going Deep To The Core At Ramen with Frank Moore
shoot for Cable TV Show
August 31, 2006
Burnt Ramen, Richmond, CA

Guest Booker Lob of Instagon

featuring
The Winston Giles Orchestra (from Australia)
Delayed Sleep
Instagon
Frank Moore's Cherotic All-Star Band

5. Susana Cook, FF Alumn, at www.nytheatre.com

The Idiot King
reviewed by Larry Kunofsky

The King sees dead people. Walking in a royal procession, the King is horrified by images of bloody, lifeless bodies strewn along his path. No one among his royal entourage can see what he sees, though the horror is all his.

While it may sound on the surface like something out of The Sixth Sense, the opening scene of The Idiot King takes on a meaning similar to the parable of "The Emperor's New Clothes"&mdashreality appears stark naked before someone surrounded by denial. What may sound utterly horrifying on the surface becomes outrageous and hilarious in Susana Cook's The Idiot King, a profoundly funny play about the unspeakably awful things that our leaders too often pretend not to see.

We're in the royal palace. The King is pampered by his nurse, who loves his every bodily function, and placated by yes-men who cautiously try to teach the King arithmetic without sounding like communists. (The King doesn't trust arithmetic because of subtraction why would anyone allow anything to be taken away from them in a good system like capitalism?) The King is a despot. He has people murdered at his whim and embraces religion as a tool to keep the weak in line. His Queen tows the party line. She tries to be even-handed and fair, but blood is on her hands, just as it is on her royal husband's. The King and Queen have a cabinet meeting where they host their beloved Pope, and the problems of the kingdom are discussed (the dangerous belief of evolution, the terror of a woman in control of her own body, etc.). I'm not sure that I could find this kingdom on a map, but all of this does sound eerily familiar to me.

This is the first play by Susana Cook that I've seen, or even heard of before, but she's a playwright, actor and director from Buenos Aires whose work is often presented at Dixon Place. Now that I've seen this play, I will make sure to check out her work from now on. Her writing is sharp, accessible, and righteously unfair and unbalanced against the ruling class. As a director, she keeps everything onstage in perfect disorder. She is an amazing actor who plays the King with both menace and magnetism she reminds me a little of Rock Goddess Patti Smith, which means that Susana Cook is kind of a superstar&mdashyou can't really take your eyes off her while she's on stage.

The best element to The Idiot King, though, is the ensemble. Anni Amberg, Jennifer Fomore, Jose Maria Garcia Armenter, Tracy Hazas, Karen Jaime, Saroya Odishoo, and Marsa Suarez-Orozco all seem completely out of their minds, but their chaotic characterizations are presented with great comic skill. I was often unsure if their hilarious asides were scripted or if they were ad-libbed, which added to the irrepressible fun of the evening.

The standout performance, though, is by Erin Markey, who, as the Queen, affects a voice uncannily like Miss Piggy's, if Miss Piggy were a selfish, egotistical shrew (actually, Miss Piggy is very much like that, now that I think of it, but this is a very non-Henson-like affair.) Every single one of the Queen's lines received a huge laugh from the audience on the night I saw this play. Silly voices are a dime a dozen, but this was a real performance worthy of the warm response.

6. Jacki Ochs, FF Alumn, at Museum of the City of NY, Sept. 11, 1 pm

Dear Friends -- We hope you will be able to attend one of the following screenings. Please forward this e-mail to anyone who might be interested.

"9/12: FROM CHAOS TO COMMUNITY" directed by Susanna Styron produced by Jacki Ochs and Susanna Styron co-producer Stephanie Zessos Editor Laure Sullivan Director of Photography Wolfgang Held music composed by Wendy Blackstone

WASHINGTON , D.C.: SEPTEMBER 10, AVALON THEATRE, 7:30 p.m. (visit www.theavalon.org for more details)

NEW YORK CITY: SEPTEMBER 11, MUSEUM OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK, 1:00 p.m. (visit www.mcny.org for more details)

WESTCHESTER COUNTY: SEPTEMBER 12, JACOB BURNS FILM CENTER, 7:30 p.m. (visit www.burnsfilmcenter.org for more details)

"9/12: From Chaos to Community", a 56-minute documentary film, combines vibrant cinema-verite footage, emotional in-depth interviews, still photographs and archival footage to tell the untold story of Ground Zero. Focusing on a group of New York City volunteers, the relationships they formed among themselves and with the rescue and recovery workers they cared for, the film creates an exuberant, vivid and moving portrait of the Ground Zero community -- as it was during the recovery effort at the World Trade Center site, and as it continues today in the life-changing relationships formed there.

PRAISE for "9/12":
. a poem to a group of everyday New Yorkers who discover in themselves a quiet greatness born from the darkness of 9/11. -- Davis Guggenheim, Director, "An Inconvenient Truth"

. I am especially grateful to the filmmakers for capturing so poignantly and accurately the shared feelings of awe, camaraderie, loss, and love that brought everyday people together in our city's greatest time of need. -- Steve Buscemi, Actor Former New York City firefighter

. a loving, honest story about generous, matter-of-fact New Yorkers who rolled up their sleeves and helped heal the city -- totally outside the limelight. They didn't do it for glory, they did it for us. It's a very moving tribute. -- Tom Healy, President, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council

. I have not been more surprised and provoked into reflection by any other 9/11 homage. -- Randall D. Marshall MD, Director of Trauma Studies and Resilience, New York State Psychiatric Institute

9/12: From Chaos to Community, An Eleventh Hour Films Production
Sponsored by the Human Arts Association, 591 Broadway, New York, NY 10012

7. Tim Miller, FF Alumn, end of Summer news and Fall highlights

I hope everyone has been having a great summer which still has lots of mileage/beach/BBQ's in it! I am looking forward to hitting the road right after Labor Day with my annual performance workshop residency in Dallas at SMU's theatre program.

This Fall I will be running around with my new show 1001 BEDS as well as my performances US and GLORY BOX in the touring repertory. (I do all three full-evening pieces in a two week span in three different cities! That will be a good brain cell check!)

In addition to SMU (Sept 15-17), I will be doing four other intensive University Residencies this Fall at Kutztown University Sept (18-24) in PA, at University of Iowa, (Oct 27-29) University of Minnesota (Nov 2-4) and at UNC Chapel Hill (Oct 8-15)!

Also performances & residencies coming up this year at Cincinnati Playhouse, CSPS in Cedar Rapids, the TRANS Festival at Univ of Wisconsin, Duke University, Hamilton College, Vortex Theatre in Austin, Rude Guerrilla Theater in CA and many more. The vibe has been very good on 1001 BEDS my new performance and book! I was very busy this Spring with runs LA, SF , Chicago, Winston-Salem, San Diego and just now in New Jersey. Here's some juicy review qoutes on the show from the daily papers. Have a great summer and beginning of Fall season and I hope to see you in 06-07!

Miller's technique &mdash a frisky, half-lidded fidget on high alert to audience energies &mdash gives way to flashes of poetic stillness that demonstrate how gracefully Miller has matured without losing either his inquisitive ardor or wicked humor.An almost shamanic spirit emerges when least expected, with striking immediacy.Think casual seduction concealing urgent consciousness-raiser, and you have the measure of "1001 Beds" and the nonpareil explorer of self and spirit who recounts them with such potent assurance.

David Nichols, LOS ANGELES TIMES

Miller's performance style in 1001 BEDS, which manages to synthesize incantatory segments with looser sections that feel almost improvisational, lends itself well to tracing the ups and downs of someone whose life and loves have often been shoved into the margins of society -- and have also provided the key to his art.
His travels for justice, art and personal revelation have led Miller into a lot of strange beds, but like most of us, what he wants most is one safe haven to share with one other simpatico soul.

Kerry Reid, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Miller's wily wordplay uses the metaphor of the bed as the stage for the beginning and end of life, and the site of the most important human experience in between -- love. Miller brought to even his angriest screeds that benign, self-mocking humor that has helped him survive across three contentious decades with his social activism intact. The writing itself is thoroughly engaging this Whittier-born artist, and his vision of a more humbly democratic and gay-friendly U.S., remains as compelling as ever.

8. Eddy Falconer, FF Alumn, at El Rio, San Francisco, Sept. 1, 8 pm

Eddy Falconer and Machiko will be co-emceeing a benefit for the San Francisco branch of The Icarus Project on Sept. 1, 2006, at El Rio. Also featured are Charlie Anders, Michelle Tea, Brooklynne Michelle, Bonfire Madigan, plus many other readers, drag and burlesque artists, and bands. DJ Jette. Doors open at 8 pm,
show starts at 9:30. Sliding scale admission. Mad
pride! El Rio is located at 3158 Mission St (@ Cesar Chavez), San Francisco, CA 94110. (415) 282-3325.

The Icarus Project serves the community of bipolar artists and activists on-line at theicarusproject.net and off-line at many locations nationwide where members have gotten together for support networks, activism around mental health issues, and cultural events. The national office is at Fountain House in midtown New York. We are a radical mental healthproject that believes bipolar disorder is as much a gift as it is a curse and which is interested in tracking the connections between madness and brilliance. We have publications available on-line at the official website, collectively produced, and have gotten together to exhibit our artworks in at least two major shows, at abcnorio in NYC's Lower East Side and currently at Fountain House on W. 47th. We have several thousand on-line members trying to navigate outside the psychiatric and other mainstreams and are
growing ever more strong offline, as well. Please join us for the SF Icarus Benefit on Sept. 1st, and visit our website, www.theicarusproject.net

9. Maureen Connor, Laura Parnes, Barbara Pollack, Michael Smith, William Wegman, FF Alumns, at EFA Gallery, NY, Sept. 8, 6-8 pm

Everybody Dance Now
Curated by Kathleen Goncharov
September 8 &ndash October 22, 2006

Opening, Sept. 8, 6 &ndash 8 PM
Dance Party, Sept. 30, 8 PM &ndash midnight

EFA Gallery / EFA Studio Center
323 West 39th Street, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10018
Wed. through Sat., 12-6 PM

For further information:
Elaine Tin Nyo, Director
T. 212-563-5855 x203,
F. 212-563-1875
[email protected]
http://efa1.org

EFA Gallery opens its fall season with a first video only exhibition curated by Kathleen Goncharov.

Artists: Jake Borndal, Sanford Biggers, caraballo-farman, Maureen Connor, Ben Coonley, Daily Dancer, Kan Xua, Kaoru Katayama, Mike Kelley, Rodney McMillian,Trine Lise Nedreaas, Christodoulos Panayiotou, Laura Parnes, Barbara Pollack, Ron Rocheleau&rsquos ConcreteTV, Valeska Soares, Michael Smith, Jennifer Sullivan, William Wegman, Wild Record Collection, and Michael Zansky

Everybody Dance Now takes its title from the opening line of the 1990 C&C Music Factory song. This exhibition, curated by Kathleen Goncharov, showcases work by an international cast of contemporary artists as well as excerpts from popular culture venues such as public access television, You Tube, and Google Video. The show celebrates the universal human urge to move to the beat (although dogs, frogs, bears, ponies, ghosts, and alligators sometimes act as surrogates for people). The title of the exhibition is literal&hellipeveryone dances when all these characters move to the groove and show off their collective talent (or lack there of).

Although many of the works in the exhibition are amusing, they often have a dark humor and address such serious issues as gender and racial stereotypes, war, violence, media manipulation, globalization, and cultural conflict. Other videos deal with more personal matters that concern us all, such as aging, mortality, the dilemmas of adolescence, and the sexual insecurities that follow us through life.

Dog Duet, by video pioneer William Wegman, features the artist&rsquos famous weimaraners who perform in perfect synch. Trine Lise Nedreaas&rsquo poetic work is a life size projection that depicts an 87 year-old man dancing the tango with an invisible partner in an abandoned ballroom. Valeska Soares&rsquo subject is similar but her dancers perform with imaginary partners on a mirrored floor in a Brazilian nightclub designed by Oscar Niemeyer.

Performance artist Michael Smith&rsquos character &ldquoMike&rdquo is a parody of the &ldquoeveryman&rdquo who craves social acceptance but like most of us ultimately ends up a loser. Smith contributes excerpts of his dancing alter ego from videos he&rsquos made over the past twenty-five years. Another everyman, an unabashed nerd, the Daily Dancer, who posts on the Internet, trips over his vacuum cleaner while dancing to Aretha Franklin&rsquos Respect. TV personality Stephen Colbert dances to the hymn King of Glory in an Internet clip and another found video teaches black people how to &ldquodance like a white guy.&rdquo

Mike Kelley&rsquos contributes two short videos from his Day is Done project in which adults reenact the &ldquoextracurricular&rdquo activities depicted in photographs from old high school yearbooks. Laura Parnes and Jennifer Sullivan also look at adolescents, in particular participants in amateur talent shows. Rodney McMillian dances to a Prince song in a disturbing blue mask and Sanford Biggers makes the connection between Hip Hop and Kung Fu. Maureen Connor&rsquos video installation recalls 1950s insecurities and gender stereotypes in a children&rsquos dance class. Barbara Pollack collaborates with her 18 year old son on a two-channel video where he and his friends dance in a simulated mosh pit and perform a tableaux of an infamous photograph from Abu Ghraib. Michael Zansky also deals with failed US policies and asks whether we are dancing our way back into the primordial slime led by Godzilla, who bears a striking resemblance to Rona ld Reagan.

Kaoru Katayama, a Japanese artist living in Spain explores cultural confusion in a video of traditional dancers from Salamanca who try to use their native steps while dancing to techno music. Christodoulos Panayiotou&rsquos video is documentation of Slow Dance Marathon, a performance in which total strangers slow dance over a twenty-four hour period to sentimental pop love songs. Kan Xua has a hilarious and surprising take on Chinese revolutionary opera and caraballo-farman&rsquos floor projection is a ballet of vibrators. Ben Coonley&rsquos mechanical ponies talk and do The Pony to a Chubby Checker song as well as teach themselves the Texas two-step.

Continuing with the animal theme, the collaborators responsible for Manhattan Neighborhood Network&rsquos Wild Record Collection feature their toy polar bear Snuffles and his stuffed animal friends who dance to cuts from their collection of thousands of LPs. Another MNN favorite, Ron Rocheleau&rsquos Concrete TV, features brilliantly edited clips of strip club dancers, car crashes and brief scenes from popular movies. Jake Borndal creates a special TV and Internet lounge for viewing these programs and found footage.

Everybody Dance Now presents work that ranges from the ridiculous to the sublime some are profound and others are downright silly, but they all reflect the human condition through the urge to dance.

Artists in the exhibition include Jake Borndal, Sanford Biggers, caraballo-farman, Maureen Connor, Ben Coonley, Daily Dancer, Kan Xua, Kaoru Katayama, Mike Kelley, Rodney McMillian, Trine Lise Nedreaas, Christodoulos Panayiotou, Nam June Paik, Laura Parnes, Barbara Pollack, Ron Rocheleau&rsquos Concrete TV, Valeska Soares, Michael Smith, Jennifer Sullivan, William Wegman, The Wild Record Collection, and Michael Zansky.

Kathleen Goncharov is an independent curator and critic. She has served as Adjunct Curator at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, US Commissioner to the 50th Venice Biennale, Public Art Curator at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Curator of the Collection at The New School. She lives and works in New York City.

This exhibition is presented by The EFA Gallery, a program of the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts. With additional support from The Milton and Sally Avery Foundation, The Helen Keeler Burke Charitable Foundation, Peter C. Gould, Materials for the Arts, and Carnegie Corporation Inc.

The EFA Gallery is a curatorial project space. Through the gallery, The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts supports the creative work of independent curators. Curators build the framework in which we understand artists and the art they make. At their best, they redefine how we look at culture. The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts believes in the essential importance of art in a civil society. The value of the artist's creative spirit is not limited by age, race, nationality or acceptance by others.

10. Irina Danilova, FF Alumn, at Pioneer Theater, NY, Sept. 5, 7 pm

We are pleased to announce that Project 59 will present the NYC premier of

Highlights
from the 59 Seconds Video Festival at
Two Boots Pioneer Theater
on Tuesday, Sep. 5, 7:00 PM

59 videos, 59 seconds each, introduce 59 international artists and a wide range of video works including a unique collection of videos that integrate number 59. A video storm of techniques, ideas and visions that sample an emerging contemporary international video art scene.

Organized by Irina Danilova and Hiram Levy. http://www.project59.org/59seconds/

The Program will be posted next week in the Future Screenings Section.

Featuring many NYC area artists as well as a wide range of international artists.
Two Boots Pioneer Theater http://www.twoboots.com/pioneer/
155 East 3rd Street (between Avenues A & B)
NY NY 10009 [212 591 0434]

Tickets: $ 9.00 [$6.50 members] with free Beer and Pizza after the screening.

Purchase online at: http://pioneertheater.tix.com/Event.asp?Event=61685
or call (800) 595-4849 (service charges apply)
F or V train to Lower East Side / Second Avenue - exit toward 1st Avenue.
9 or 21 bus to Houston Street and Avenue A.

Please welcome and tell friends and colleagues.

11. William Scarbrough, FF Alumn, at Michaelis Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa, Sept. 5-29

Reclamation
William Scarbrough
Michaelis Gallery, 31 Orange Street. Cape Town, South Africa
Michaels School of Fine Art
University of Cape Town
Tuesday, September 5 &ndash September 29, 2006
Gallery hours: Monday &ndash Friday, 9am &ndash 5pm, Saturday, 10am &ndash 1pm

From 1979 to 1981 a series of mysterious murders in Atlanta, Georgia gripped the world while appearing each night on the evening news. During this time, a killer, or group of killers, brutally murdered sixty-three African American children and young adults as the media relentlessly covered the story. Twenty-five years later, it is widely accepted that Wayne Bertram Williams is The Atlanta Child Murderer.

Reclamation is the latest work by William Scarbrough in which he uses The Atlanta Child Murders to explore two of the most elusive environments known to man, the media and the memory. He has spent the past five years in an effort to reclaim what to him was a media event, witnessed on television as a twelve-year-old boy in the early 1980&rsquos. Through this exhibition, Scarbrough illuminates one of the difficult issues of The Information Age - the power of the media to control our perceptions in establishing a cultural truth.

He has directly challenged &ldquoThe Truth&rdquo of these murders by going back to interview all the people involved the police, the United States Federal Bureau of Investigations, the Georgia State Bureau of Investigations, the prosecution and defense teams in the Wayne Williams trial, local authorities and politicians, reporters, authors, supreme court justices, eyewitnesses, mothers of the victims, the Williams family, and even Wayne Williams - the man convicted of the murders, juxtaposing his discoveries against the media presentation of these tragic events.

Through his process of reclaiming The Atlanta Child Murders as his own, Scarbrough has collected his interviews on digital video while gathering documents, images, television news footage, radio broadcasts, police files, court decisions and pulp articles.

From this enormous database, Scarbrough has created Reclamation, a multimedia installation utilizing modern technology to navigate a media frenzy that consumed and regurgitated this story during an age of technological infancy.

What Scarbrough brings to us is his journey through masses of information, confusion, sensationalization, and bewilderment - a journey that leaves him lost within the murky remnants of a conspiracy.

For more information please contact William Scarbrough.

12. Regina Vater, FF Alumn, Smithsonian oral history, now online

Here's the link to Regina Vater&rsquos online oral history interview via the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution:

13. Robin Tewes, FF Alumn, at Pace University, Oct. 4, 11 am

Robin Tewes, FF Alumn, Fall Faculty Art Talks 2006 - Open to the Public October 4, 2006, 11AM Pace University 41 Park Row, Room 1204 - Refreshments Served!

Goings On is compiled weekly by Harley Spiller

click http://www.franklinfurnace.org/goings_on.html
to visit 'This Month's World Wide Events'.
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Farman F.212 - History

The oldest Khojkî ms in existence in institutional collections appears to be one that was copied in 1793 Samvat (1736 CE). A. Nanji, The Nizârî Ismâcîlî Tradition, p. 10. Most of the mss are only a century old. This paucity of older mss is a great stumbling block in trying to retrace the history of the Sat Pañthîs. Nevertheless, there is concrete evidence that the task of recording Sat Pañthi religious literature began much earlier than the oldest ms sources available. In an early nineteenth century ms, the scribe seems to have come across a specific reference recording what appears to have been a contemporary incident. The exact reference is to "Pîr Dâdû who left, with all well-being, from Nagar for Bhuj in the year 1641 Samvat (1584 CE)."

Z. Nooraly, Catalogue of Khojki Manuscripts, ms. 38. It is obvious that such an insertion, which was entirely unrelated to the copyist's task of writing down Ginâns, shows that his source must either have been a much older ms recording a contemporary event, or one that contained such early information. In addition, an ancient ms dated 1622 Samvat (1565 CE) was presented as evidence in the celebrated "Hâjî Bîbî Case" of 1905, but this ms can no longer be traced. Cited in A. Nanji, The Nizârî Ismâcîlî Tradition, p. 11.

It is unfortunate that so few of the mss contain historical details which would give us information about the scribe. Even the date of copying is rarely given and must often be drawn from internal evidence. For example, many of the mss in the collection have "drying sand" still shining on the folios, indicating the pre-nineteenth century workmanship of the copyist. When dates are indicated, they are usually given in the Samvat era, but occasionally the Hijri or Christian era is also specified. Some of the mss even give the date in a combination of these eras. An example of this is found in ms BAK /1 in which a date is given as "Ramzan 19, 1920 Samvat!"

In addition to Ginâns, several other types of literature are found in the mss. A description of these are as follows:

Farmân - an order, commandment or instruction from the Ismâcîlî Imâm or his Hujja. Catalogued as Farmân Name Date Place

Fâl-Nâmâ - tables of divination, often containing number

Various forms of mystical poetry including - Si Harfi, Chautisa, Barahmasa, Kâfî, Wâi, Charkha Nâmâ, Kapâitî, Ghazal, Bhajan etc.

p. 1 E virâ bhâi kar liyo kamai - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 2 Sab ghat sâmi maro - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 4 Hu balhari gur âpanu - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 6 Pîr tam turat thani badhi - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (4th jodilo, unpublished)

p. 7 Eji hasi kije virâ har tani murat - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (5th jodilo)

p. 8 Eji sevâ kije ali nabi ki - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 10 Ek jire bhâire sachalo marag - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 13 Allah ek kasam sabukâ duniyâ uski sari - Pîr Hasan

p. 16 Anat kalap me age tuhij hotâ - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (51 verses)

p. 22 Venti karuñ chhu - Pîr Abdul Nabi

p. 25 Saloko Nano - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (60 verses)

p. 36 Âs tamari sri ho kayam sâmi - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 38 Avichal allah avichal khalak - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 39 Is duniyâ me tu bhuli kem jave - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 41 Farmân ilâhi jibrail ko - Imâm Shâh

p. 44 Ginân bolore nit nure bhariyâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 45 Uth jag man merâ - Imâm Begum

p. 46 Tum chet man merâ - Imâm Begum

p. 47 Darshan dio morâ nath - Imâm Begum

p. 48 Sat gur miliyâ mune âj - Imâm Begum

p. 49 Har dam japo pîr shâh nu jap - Imâm Begum

p. 50 Har dam karo abhias - Imâm Begum

p. 51 Har dam dharie dhyan - Imâm Begum

p. 52 Ham dil khalak - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 53 Ham dil khalak - Pîr Shams

p. 54 Pahele paro te sat gur ni vachâ - Pîr Sat Gur Nûr

p. 56 Partham gur nar sreviye - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 58 Vir jâ shar to shatore - Pîr Indra Imâm Dîn

p. 60 Eji picho payâ soi parat - Pîr Shams (unpublished)

p. 62 Shâh ne kaje jivanâ je man dhiyavo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 64 Sâmi rajo more man thi - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 65 Uth beth bandâ tu kahi sutâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 70 Hete su milo marâ munivar - Sayyid Imâm Shâh

p. 72 Eji mero shâh â sreve hekman - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 74 Âpano âp pichano - Sayyid Imâm Shâh

p. 77 Bhamar gufare upar dekhantâ - Sayyid Muhammad Shâh

p. 78 Partak patrane parkhine - Sayyid Imâm Shâh

p. 82 Tith navmi âviâ gur (garbi 19) - Pîr Shams

p. 84 Sâmi rajo avase, virâ bhâi tambal - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 86 Tadu tadu mitanu - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 87 Shâh takâ vanitajo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (unpublished)

p. 88 Triveni sañsâr mahe jilantâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 90 Khipat rupvae - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (3rd Jodilo,

p. 92 Gantri patrâ jo ginân satnâ sarovar - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 94 Sâhebe farmân lakhi - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 96 Partak vilodi - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 99 Ramtâ ramtâ prabhu patan - Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (111 verses)

p. 119 Bharpur rahelâ pan - Imâm Shâh

Remarks: starts on p. 3, pages out of order

Remarks: ms contains an interesting note on folio 17 describing an earlier ms.

p. 1 Mal khajinâ - Sayyid Gulâm cAlî Shâh

p. 2 Adam âd nirinjan - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 4 Tajio sangku sang - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 10 Chilâ chodi dînkâ - Sayyid Muhammad Shâh

p. 14 Kare bhâi amarâ puriâ - Imâm Shâh (unpublished)

p. 20 Asmani tambal vajiâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 22 Pacham deshthi prabhu padhariyâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 28 Pacham desh prabhu partak bethâ -

p. 36 Amrâ puri âgan ek gugri - Imâm Shâh (unpublished)

p. 37 Vavso tevu lunso - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 39 Âsmani tambal vajiâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 43 Jog kâ pidâ naelâ - Pîr Shams

p. 45 Ek shabad suno mere bhâi - Pîr Shams

Remarks: pages not numbered

Sat veni vadi - 222 verses

Du'â (Silsila ends with Sultân Muhammad Shâh)

Colophon: p. 122 says "Hussein Yeja Ramzan Karachi valla," p. 139 says "Gulamhussain Hashim Fuds"

Remarks: numbering is very confused

p. 14 Ham dil khalak mavlâ tuhi vase, yâ alî tuhi vase

avval nâ dujâ - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (unpublished)

p. 1 Sâmi rajo ave jangi dol - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 2 Sâmi rajo âvase virâbhâi tambal vajase - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 4 Uniyâ bhi uniyâ ame kiriyanâ hinâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 7 Dharam ladho lahire fulane - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 11 Uth jâg man merâ - Imâm Begum

p. 12 Tum chet man merâ - Imâm Begum

p. 14 Marnâ hai re jarur - Imâm Begum

p. 15 Darsan dio morâ nath - Imâm Begum

p. 17 Satgur miliyâ mune âj - Imâm Begum

p. 18 Hardam jampo pir shâh nu jamp - Imâm Begum

p. 19 Hardam karo abhias - Imâm Begum

p. 21 Hardam darie dhyan - Imâm Begum

p. 22 Is duniyâ me tu bhuli kem jave - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 24 Sat panth sat nu mukh chhe - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 29 Eji kayam mahdi raho - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 31 Kartâ juge dvar - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 33 More âshaji harovar sarovar - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 34 Satnâ sarovar sarasar bhariâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 36 Eji kaho kaho pindatâ jug satjug keri batiâ - Pîr

Sadr al-Dîn and Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (unpublished)

p. 39 Pacham deshthi prabhu padaryâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 43 Pacham deshe prabhu partak betâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 49 Âs tamari sri ho - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 51 Venti karu chhu sâheb morâ - Sayyid Abdul Nabi

p. 53 Ame sâheb sathe sahel kidhâ - Sayyid Fateh cAlî Shâh

p. 55 Hu re piyasi - Mirâ Sayyid Khan

p. 58 Jug dvapur me jagan - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 60 Juthire duniyâ tame kae bhulo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 62 Sañsâr sagar madhe - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 63 Jio âtma ram avigat sirevo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 65 Jio âtmâ ram tame bhanâ ginâni - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 65 Kahe pir hasan kabir din srevo nar - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 68 Unchare kot bahu vechan - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 69 Chet chet banâ man chanchal - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 70 Samundar bohotan bamu - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 73 Dhan ho rikhisar tame tirat - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (jodilo)

p. 75 Sat ho sukrit gur nar arado - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (jodilo)

p. 76 Panth sir betâ sukrit kamavo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (jodilo)

p. 78 Ajar jariyo nâ jay - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (jodilo)

p. 80 Srevo srevo momano gur gat kero - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (jodilo)

p. 81 Jire bhâi purvâ janamno sacho bhag amaro - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (jodilo)

p. 83 Yarâ shafayat muhammad karase - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 84 Jampu â dipe umayeo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 86 Jugmahe srevo kiskire - Imâm Shâh

p. 88 Hu balhari gur âpane - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 90 Hu balhari tame shâh - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (unpublished)

p. 91 Ginân bolore nit nure bhariâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 92 Anat kalap me âge tuhij - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 98 Sham sadaji sacho sham - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 100 Farmân (unreadable due to water damage)

p. 117 Uthi allah nâ gure bandâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 118 Sab gat sâmi maro bharpur - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 121 Ho jire virâ sat nâ gat virâ srevie - Imâm Shâh

p. 1 Bhajans, Kâfis, Ghazals etc.

p. 38 Shâm sadâji sacho shâm sadâj - Pîr Shams

p. 44 Satpanth sacho ji lie - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 48 Dur deshthi ayao - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 49 Pakio tarik sâhebjo farmân mutib

p. 50 Bhayo baramnâ bhuliyo - Pîr Satgur Nur

p. 59 Abdu kiare zanu mahe ginân (unpublished)

Remarks: Starts on p. 31, pp. 45 - 54 missing

p. 31 Ending of a 33 verse Ginân by Pîr Indra Imâm Dîn

p. 32 Sâheb ji tu more man bhave - Sayyid Muhammad Shâh

p. 32 Sat gur bhetiâ kem janie - Pîr Shams

p. 33 Sab ghat sâmi maro barpur bethâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 36 Hu re piyasi piâ tere darshanki - Mirâ Sayyid Khan

p. 39 Sachire sahiyaku nisdîn srevo - Sayyid Khan (jodilo)

p. 40 Jire virâ hu balhari gur apane - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 42 Eji pelore name sâhebji ko vadolije - Pîr Shams

p. 44 Sachâ merâ khalak sarjanhar - Pîr Shams

p. 59 Khat darshanji vel - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (50 verses)

Date: page 86 says "Samvat 1960," last page says "24/8/1921 [1926?]

Colophon: last page says "Tando Mohamed Khan (Sind)"

Remarks: Several pages reversed, some pages out of order, pp. 23, 26-30, 72, 146-147, 188-189, 194-195, 220-221, 235, and

238 are missing, pp. 206-207 are to be found after p.

209, Râgs of some ginâns is indicated, number of garbi

indicated ms probably follows Lâljî Devrâj's publication

p. 7 Tame ramajo dîn ne rat - Pîr Shams (garbi 7)

p. 8 Tame jampajo dîn ne rat - Pîr Shams (garbi 8)

p. 9 Bhulo bhulo te bhulo - Pîr Shams (Garbi 9)

p. 9 Sat marag shams pîr dekhiyâ - Pîr Shams (Garbi 10)

p. 10 Sat paval piyo dîn ne rat ke - Pîr Shams (Garbi 11)

p. 12 Cheto cheto te chanchal - Pîr Shams (Garbi 12)

p. 12 Gurji âviyâ satmi rat ke - Pîr Shams (Garbi 13)

p. 13 Satgur shams em kahere gafalo - Pîr Shams (Garbi 14)

p. 14 Gur kahere gafalo sambharo - Pîr Shams (Garbi 15)

p. 15 Tith atmi aviyâ gam nâ lok - Pîr Shams (Garbi 16)

p. 16 Nar kasam shâh nâ farmân thi - Pîr Shams (Garbi 17)

p. 17 Bhulo bhulo te bhamayo- Pîr Shams (Garbi 18)

p. 18 Tith navmi aviyâ - Pîr Shams (Garbi 19)

p. 20 Pîr nachine kathe - Pîr Shams (Garbi 20)

p. 21 Sat marag satwanti sambharo - Pîr Shams (Garbi 21)

p. 22 Gur vadiâ dasmi rat - Pîr Shams (Garbi 22)

p. 24 End of Tare vagâ te ginân - Pîr Shams (Garbi 24)

p. 24 Jyare avi chhe cheli - Pîr Shams (Garbi 25)

p. 31 Ending of a Ginân by Imâm Shâh

p. 33 Partak vilodîne - Pîr Shams

p. 34 Sat tane mukh mar nâ hove - Sayyid Kutubdîn

p. 36 Eji par ghar prit nâ kije - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (unpublished)

p. 38 Samku âvantâ jo kahe - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 38 Eji partam muni evâ - Sayyid Saleh (jodilo)

p. 39 Sham sadaji sacho sam sadaji - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 41 Ramtâ ramtâ prabhu patan aviyâ - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 45 Pîr puchi tame panth kamavo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 46 Jago rikhisar morâ bhâi - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (jodilo)

p. 49 Saloko - Satgur Nur (47 verses)

p. 56 Satgur kahe tame suno marâ munivar - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 60 Mirjâ khalk srevo to bhalere bhâi - Sayyid Imâm Shâh

p. 63 Âsh tamari shri ho kayam sâmi - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 64 Venti karu chhu - Abdul Nabi (jodilo)

p. 66 Ame sâheb sathe sahel kidhâ - attributed to Abdul Nabi

p. 67 Eji utamji thao te tum alakh ne aradho - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 68 Virchâ sher mahe shâh maro - Imâm Shâh (unpublished)

p. 69 Sâhebji tu more man bhave - Sayyid Muhammad Shâh

p. 70 Apano âp pichano - Imâm Shâh

p. 71 Bhamar gufâ upar dekhantâ - Sayyid Muhammad Shâh

p. 73 Amar te ayo more shâhjijo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 75 Sacho to moro sahiyâ - Muhammad Shâh

p. 77 Jampu tame jampu tame var shâh - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 80 Kahet surjâ sambharo kamal putrâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 81 Bhalere bhâi tame kar lio kamai - Sayyid Muhammad Shâh

p. 82 Eji dhunabhi dhunabhi sâmi maro - Pîr Shams

p. 83 Jire virâ prani chhe mavnâ virâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 85 Ek sapnu antar mahe suniyo - Pîr Shams (variation)

p. 87 Uth jag man merâ - Imâm Begum

p. 88 E virâ marâ dhan putrâ mayâ - Pîr Shams (unpublished)

p. 90 Dhan dhan sâmi râjâ tu sarjanhar - Sayyid Imâm Shâh

p. 93 E virâ bhâi kar lio bande - Imâm Shâh (unpublished)

p. 94 Sum nahi tu jag saverâ - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 95 Sarag bhavanthi bhâ mati mangai - Fazal Shâh

p. 97 Sâmi tamari vadi mahe - Pîr Shams

p. 98 Pîr Satgur Nur jo Saloko (119 verses)

p. 116 Pîr Sadr al-Dîn's Vado Das Avatâr

p. 138 Jityâ dul dul gode sâmi rajo charse - Pîr Shams

p. 143 Ke râjâ pandave to meli - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 145 Pachame âyâ shâh partak payâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 148 Jire valâ path mandavine chok purave - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 150 Ashaji harovar sarovar - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 152 Pacham desh thi prabhu padharyâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 156 Yarâ anat karodi vadhayu - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 158 Ahio ahio haseji - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (jodilo, unpublished)

p. 160 Eji roj kiyamat dîn avie - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 161 Mahadîn rah hasedâ - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (unpublished)

p. 162 Sahiâ so mahadev ali nur shâh - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 165 Brahm Prakash - Pîr Shams (149 verses)

p. 177 Buj Nirinjan - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (33 Chugas)

p. 209 Satveni nandhi - Imâm Shâh (22 chugas)

p. 242 Si Harfi - Sayyid Ahmad Shâh (8 chugas)

p. 252 Jugme fire shâhji muneri - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 254 Ashaji sacho shâh to alakh - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

Date: page 39 says "Vaisakh 23, 1956 Samvat"

p. 1 Farmâns Sultân Muhammad Shâh Fagan 21, 1956 Samvat

copied from original book (see p. 39)

p. 40 Si Harfi - Sayyid Ahmad Shâh (8 Chugas)

p. 64 Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh 11-2-1921 n.p.

p. 73 Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh 24-3-1923 Tubhi

Date: pages 51 and 68 say "1960 Samvat"

Colophon: last page says "Abd Husayn"

p. 1 Ghazals, Bayts, Kâfis etc.

p. 74 Kuch Karliyo - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (unpublished) page torn

Date: Last page says "Monday 28/11/50" in both English and

Colophon: Last page says "Shamsher Ali Hussein" (?) Khwâjâ

p. 1 Questions and Answers - seems to be from a religion

p. 69 Uth beth re kiyâ sutâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 73 Tamku sadhare so dîn - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 75 Ab teri muhobat lagi - Pîr Shams

p. 79 Avâ gurnar sâmine sreviye - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

Colophon: page 1 says "Ramji Dass s/o Lala Jawala Dass Dhir,

Kadirabad Abod Pin Dadan Khan"

p. 84 Sarag bhavanthis bhâi mati mangai - Sayyid Fazal Shâh

p. 86 Ramtâ ramtâ prabhu patan aviyâ - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 96 Anant Akhado - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (62 verses)

Date: Tapsilo says "1938 Samvat"

f. 1 Sâmi tamari vadi mahe - Pîr Shams

f. 3 Das Avatâr Nano - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (Shâh to Âpohi âp)

f. 7 Âsh tamari shri ho - to Abdul Nabi

f. 8 Venti karu chhu - Abdul Nabi (jodilo)

f. 10 Ame sâheb sathe sahel kidhâ - Abdul Nabi (jodilo)

f. 11 Nindarane varo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 11 Gat mahe avine virâbhâi amiras pije - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

(unpublished or verses out of order)

f. 12 Uthamaj thao to tame alakhne aradho - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 13 Nur velâ nur piyo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 14 Sekh palag par betho sâmi -

f. 15 Pacham deshthi prabu padaryâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 17 Pacham dise prabhu paratak bethâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 22 Sat panth sat nu mukh chhe - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 23 Navroz nâ dîn sohamanâ - munajat (jodilo)

f. 25 Pathi pathi ho morâ shâh - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 27 Anant Akhado - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (starts with verse 300)

f. 52 Saloko Satgur Nur jo (Saloko Nano) - 119 parts

f. 68 Pîr Sadr al-Dîn jo das avatâr vado

f. 85 Arjun Gitâ - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (46 parts, unpublished)

f. 93 Jitiyâ dul dul ghodo sâmi - Pîr Shams

f. 96 Satgur kahe tum suno marâ munivaro - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 100 E virâ marâ dhan putrâ mayâ - Pîr Shams (unpublished)

f. 101 Dhan dhan sâmi râjâ tu sirjan har - Imâm Shâh

f. 103 Âj to amarat rachio ane bhale padharyâ bhayvan -

f. 104 Sun sun bhâive momano esâ kaljug - Pîr Shams

f. 105 Eji karsan boltâ te anant vani - Imâm Shâh

f. 106 Ghar sar vadhayu - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 107 Sañsâr sagar mahe - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 108 Chet chet banâ man chanchal - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (jodilo)

f. 109 Eji purakh pacham - Remtullah Shâh

f. 110 Sarag bhavanthi mati mangai - Sayyid Fazal Shâh

f. 111 Pîr puchâ tame path srevo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (unpublished)

f. 112 Kasani didhi yarâ sat serku - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 113 Âsh tamari tribhovar sâmi - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 114 Jago rikhisar morâ bhâi - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 116 E virâ bhâi kar lio bandagi - Sayyid Imâm Shâh

f. 117 Sham ku âvantâ jo kahe - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 118 Dandukar ni sankh marije - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 119 Sambharo momano ved ni vat - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 120 Sam nahi tu jag savere - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 121 Satgur sathe gothadi kije - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 122 Pat mandavine chok parave - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 123 Ke râjâ pandave te meli jare prathvi - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 125 Ahunkar sabde shâh arab kiâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 127 Sâmi tamari vadi mahe - Pîr Shams

f. 127 Thar thar moman bhâi koi koi raheshe - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 130 Dharam ladho lakhin pulane - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (unpublished)

f. 132 Das avatâr vado - Imâm Shâh (parts 943 - 1362)

Remarks: appears to be lithographed

p. 1 Ugamiyâ sohi dîn - Sayyid Muhammad Shâh

p. 2 Yâ alî khub mijalas - Munajat

p. 4 Jug dvapur me jagan odhario - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 7 Sat suno ne sat sambharo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (unpublished)

p. 9 Alakh srevo banâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 10 Jiv tu javâ deh ane sañsâr - Pîr Shams

f. 13 Dhan dhan âjano dadalore ame - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 15 Mithadu ahi bolo - Pîr Shams

f. 17 Uthi allah nâ gure bandâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 18 Jago jago bhâida, em shâh - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 22 Nur velâ nur pio - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (jodilo)

f. 23 Tari âs karine hurâ chalkar âvire - Imâm Shâh

f. 26 Shâh srevo hek man - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (unpublished)

f. 28 Nave avatâr shâh nav danav chedeo - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

Remarks: pages not numbered

p. Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Jeth 1, 1916 Samvat n.p.

p. Farmân Pîr Shâhbuddîn Shâh 1939 Samvat (1883 CE) n.p.

p. Farmân Pîr Shâhbuddîn Shâh 1940 Samvat (1884 CE) n.p.

p. Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh Man 15, 1958 Samvat (1900

p. Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Magsar Sud 2, 1934 Samvat (1874 CE) n.p.

p. Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Magsar Sud 3, 1934 Samvat n.p.

Colophon: scribe was Vibhuti Bhushân Bañdo Padyây of Tilak

p. 20 Farmân Gur Pîr Salâmat n.d. n.p.

p. 27 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh 1881 CE n.d. n.p.

p. 28 Farmân Pîr Shâhbuddîn Shâh mijlas of Muharram's chalisma, Samvat 1939 (1883 CE) Vadîne Bangle, Bombay

p. 30 Farmân Pîr Shâhbuddîn Shâh Samvat 1940 (1884 CE) n.p.

p. 35 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh 1884 CE Bombay

p. 2 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Magsar Sud 2, 1930 Samvat (1874 CE) Bombay

p. 3 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Bhadarvâ Sud 3, 1934 Samvat

p. 8 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh 1881 CE Bombay

p. 9 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh 1884 CE Bombay

p. 1 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Magsar Sud 2, 1930 Samvat (1874 CE) Bombay

p. 2 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Bhadarvâ Sud 3, 1934 Samvat

p. 1 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Magsar Sud 2, 1930 Samvat (1874 CE) n.p.

p. 2 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Bhadarvâ Sud 3, 1934 Samvat

p. 9 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh 1881 CE Bombay

p. 11 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh 1884 CE Bombay

Remarks: pages not numbered

p. Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Samvat 1930 (1874 CE) Bombay

p. Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Samvat 1934 (1878 CE) n.p.

p. 1 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Samvat 1934 (1878 CE) n.p.

p. 3 Farmân Samvat 1924 Bombay

Date: Front Cover Stamped "Jul 6, 1919" [sic]

Colophon: Front cover stamped "Karmally Munjee, Bombay"

p. 3 Du'â (silsila ends with the name of Imâm Sultân Muhammad Shâh)

p. 37 Uth jâg man merâ - Imâm Begum

p. 40 Har dham japo Pîr Shâh no jañp - Imâm Begum

p. 43 Ham dhal khalak - Pîr Shams

p. 45 Duniâ sarji ne Shâhâ more - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 47 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Asuji 10, 1924 Samvat Jamât Keshuno-o, Karachi

p. 56 Sheth kahe tame shañbhalo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 59 Duram desh thi âyo vanjâro - Pîr Hasan Shâh

p. 61 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Ashâh 24, 1927 Samvat Bombay

p. 72 Jire bâi nân hatâ âpane ne puchhiu âto - Bai Budhai

p. 75 Jire bâi châr pohor heshtâ ramtâ jase - Imâm Shâh

Remarks: missing several pages between 41-63

p. 2 Story of guidance from Prophet Muhammad to Hazrat cAlî

p. 21 Du'â (Silsila ends with the name of Imâm Sultân Muhammad Shâh)

p. 64 Two Farmâns Pîr Salâmat Dâtâr Sarkar Bibi Sâheb 1850 [CE ?] 1266 AH

p. 94 Sayings of Hazrat cAlî

p. 97 Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh Wednesday Magsar 11, 1950, 5:00 PM Manjevdi

p. 97 Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh Monday, Magsar 16, 1950 Samvat Manjevdi

p. 100 Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh Wednesday, Magsar 17, 1950 Samvat [sic, Tuesday?] Manjevdi

p. 106 Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh Thursday, Magsar 19, 1950 Samvat Manjevdi

p. 113 Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh Friday, Magsar 20, 1950 Samvat Manjevdi

p. 117 Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh Saturday, Magsar

p. 119 Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh Tuesday, Magsar 24, 1950

Colophon: several sections written by Devsi Nanji (see, for example, p. 122)

p. 6 Farmân Pos 19, 1959 Samvat Bombay Vade Khaneja

p. 8 Farmân July 27, 1905 Bombay

p. 12 Farmân February 16, 1904 Bombay

p. 17 Farmân Ashadh 20, 1956 Jangbar

p. 22 Farmân March 16, 1902, 5:00 PM Bombay, Vadi

p. 26 Farmân Chaitra 1976 Samvat, May 30, 1920 CE Karachi

p. 31 Farmân 12-3-22 Morâ Jamat Khana

p. 33 Farmân March 30, 1923 CE Bombay, Kandi Mohol

p. 57 Farmân Friday, January 13, 1905 CE, 4:00 PM Calcutta

p. 60 Farmân 1956 Samvat [?] Jangbar

p. 62 Farmân 8-11-1905 Mombasa at the Imâm's Bungalow

p. 65 Farmân Month of Fâg [?] Poona

p. 67 Selected verses of a Saloko

p. 70 Selected verses of Anañt Akhâdo or Nav Chhugâ

p. 74 Sat pañth vohri virâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 75 Garbi Prem ni - Eji Prem Maganmañ râji maro valo - seems to have been composed by scribe

p. 80 Verses 8-10 of Pîr Shams' Garbi #7

p. 80 Bar varasno balak bhayore - Pîr Shams

p. 80 Portions of a Ginân by Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 88 Tuñhi gur tuñhi nar - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 89 Duniyâ sirji ne shâh more - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 90 Nindrane varo prani - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 90 Gat mañhe âvi ne - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 92 Duniyâ chalatrâ dekh kar - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 93 Chet chet bânâ chanchal - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 94 Partak vilodie fañs mañdi - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 95 E virâ bhâi pir puchhi tame pañth kamâvo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 97 Jire bhâire sansâr sâgar mâñhe tame bhuli mat jao - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 102 E virâ marâ bhâi jire sañsâr sapnu karine - Imâm Shâh

p. 103 Sâhebe farmân lakhi mokalyâ - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 104 Teri roji tujar nu dhuñd - unpublished

p. 105 Farmân March 13, 1934 Rangoon

p. 113 Ek shabd suno mere bhâi - Pîr Shams

p. 118 Ghatt bethâ nuñ Ginân - Sat gur padharyâ tame jagajo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 120 Tariye tuñ tarañ har - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 123 Kaiñre moman bhâi me suvore na chintâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 123 Âs puni ham shâh dar payâ - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 125 Bhajan - Ganapat Goviñd

p. 126 Mâyâ mamtâ chho (one verse) - Imâm Shâh

p. 126 Âs tamari shri ho - Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 128 Selected verses of a grañth on meditation

Colophon: page 191 indicates that the ms was written in Bânâ

p. Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Ramzan 19, 1920 Samvat [sic!]

p. 13 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Ashad 1, 1923 Samvat Junagat

p. 17 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Ashad, 1927 Samvat Kathiavar

p. 21 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Ashad 1 (Châñd Rât), Jeth 5, 1927 Samvat [sic, which is the correct date?] Bombay

p. 34 Farmân n.d. Sadhas Bangle

p. 44 Farmân Pîr Salâmat Dâtâr 20th night of Jeth 1927 Samvat Pîr Salâmat Dâtâr jâ vadi jo bangle me

p. 101 Farmân Pîr Salâmat Dâtâr Bîbî Fâtimâ [?] / Bibi Sarkar 1906 Samvat Karbala

p. 127 Farmân Pîr Salâmat Dâtâr Âsho 17, 1929 Samvat n.p.

p. 148 Farmân Agâ Pîr Salâmat Âsho 25, 1928 Samvat n.p.

p. 197 Farmân Pîr Salâmat Dâtâr Shravan 3 [no year] n.p.

Colophon: the name "Hashambhâi Visram" is stamped on p. 56 and written on p. 57

p. 1 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh Badarvâ Sud 3, 1934 Samvat

p. 1 Khat Niriñjan - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (260 verses)

p. 30 Chatris Krod - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (180 verses) unpublished

p. 67 Su Kriyâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (100 verses)

p. 75 Sahi Samarani - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (32 verses)

p. 77 Yâ Khudâvind Anat Kanar mahe - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (51 verses)

p. 2 Anat Akhano - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (11 verses only)

p. 5 Par fati nir ultiâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (writing changes)

p. 9 Das Avatâr - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 25 Jire virâ sat châlo mârâ munivaro [?] - Imâm Shâh

p. 26 Jire bhâi amarâ puri agane ek - Imâm Shâh

p. 35 Kasani ho dhidhi virâ sat saerko - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 1 E virâ bhâi jago rikhisar morâ bhâi

f. 6 Ginân by Imâm Shâh - title undecipherable

f. 9 Kasani didhi yarâ sat saher ku - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 3 Sahentar dip me shâh - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 5 Srevo srevo momano - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn chogadio

p. 7 Pahelâ pahelâ nâm ji e khudâ ji ko lijo - Pîr Sâhebdîn

p. 9 Pindat tejo ek kisi ghar na jatâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 12 Jen re gatiye shâh ke khanre umayo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 14 Dehi gur ke vachâ - Pîr Tâj al-Dîn

p. 20 Moman man em janajo ji - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 22 Dul dul ghodo ali chadse - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 26 Yarâ anat karodi ke vadhâyu - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 32 Gat lokâ jie umâyo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 37 Jire vâlâ sat gur sathe gothadi kije - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 40 Jire vâlâ dhanre ghadi jo dîn sant - Imâm Shâh

p. 43 Kayam mahdi ali - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 46 Kartâ juge dvar - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 48 More ashaji harovar sarovar - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 51 Sat nâ sarovar sarâsar - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 55 Âs tamari sri ho - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 59 Veñti karuñ chu - Pîr Abdul Nabi

p. 62 Ame sâheb sâthe sahel kidhâ - Pîr Abdul Nabi

p. 65 Ginân by Pîr Sadr al-Dîn - title undecipherable

p. 68 Sâhebe farmân lakhi - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 74 Chet chet banâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 76 Samundar bohotaj banu - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 79 Jug dvapurmañ jagan odharyâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 82 Pâcham thi shâh nâ dar avase - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 84 Ut put rachanâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 89 Jamin âsaman sâhebe jugate jariyâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 91 Alakh srevo banâ apanu - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 92 Sâmi râjâ jampu â dipe umayo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 94 Juthire duniyâ tame kai bhulo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 99 Magaj re moman mârag ladho - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 105 Kar gin bande kar gin - Pîr Sâhebdîn (unpublished)

p. 107 Virâ marâ joi joi marag chalo - Sayyid Al Imâm

p. 111 Is duniyâ meñ tuñ kem bhuli kem jave - Pîr Hasan

p. 114 Sab ghat sâmi maro barpur - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 118 Sachâ re sahiyaku ap dîn srevo - Sayyid Khan

p. 121 Sachoñ tu moro sâhiyañ - Sayyid Muhammad Shâh

p. 124 Partham gur nar sreviye - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 127 Jugamañhe shrevâ kiskire ho - Imâm Shâh

p. 129 Ginân bolore nit nure bharyâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 131 Uth jag man merâ - Imâm Begum

p. 133 Tum chet man merâ - Imâm Begum

p. 136 Marnâ hai re jarur - Imâm Begum

p. 139 Har dam karo abhias - Imâm Begum

p. 141 Har dam dharie dhyan - Imâm Begum

p. 144 Aparam jâre âvase - Imâm Shâh

p. 146 Uthi allah nâ gure bande - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 149 Nur velâ nur piyo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 151 Tare puthiade chhe pañch - Pîr Shams

p. 153 Gat guru ji gat guru ji - Pîr Shams

p. 159 Ham dil khâlak - Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 160 Shakhakhe hekman ahi srevo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (unpublished)

p. 166 Adam âd niriñjan - Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (50 verses)

p. 178 Huñ re piyâsi - Mirâ Sayyid Khan

p. 185 Ek jire sâmi âs tamâri - Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 189 Dhan dhan âj no - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 195 Uttar khañd mañhe shâh ni jot - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 197 Bhayre bhar ma tan no yar - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 201 Suno suno momano - Pîr Shams

p. 211 Sâheb merâ ek niralab amrat - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 213 Jâgo jâgo ho nâ sumiyo - Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 215 Sat Veni - Nûr Muhammad Shâh

p. 231 Abadu man jite - Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

Remarks: numbering starts again after p. 71

p. 2 Dul dul ghodo nipanu - Imâm Shâh

p. 4 Sat bolore munivaro - Imâm Shâh (unpublished)

p. 7 Bavâ murakh loke me maram nâ jane - Imâm Shâh

p. 10 Tame gaflat me mâ suvore munivaro - Imâm Shâh

p. 12 Hete suñ milo mârâ munivar - Imâm Shâh

p. 14 Hete mili ne sate chaljo - Imâm Shâh

p. 17 Gur bhirmâ ji jugâ juge aviyâ - Imâm Shâh

p. 20 Jiv chodavâ sat pañth maliâ - Imâm Shâh

p. 22 Verâ potine ved vicharo - Imâm Shâh

p. 25 Kal jug puran paravario - Imâm Shâh

p. 27 Sat gur suñ sat pañth janiye - Imâm Shâh

p. 32 Sâcho re sat pañth parie - Imâm Shâh

p. 40 Verâ poti ne vilañb nâ kije - Imâm Shâh

p. 44 Aj kaljug puran thaeo ane sati - Imâm Shâh

p. 46 Eji sacho diavone bhâi ginân vichâro - Imâm Shâh

p. 48 Lobh savarthe jiv tu bhulio - Imâm Shâh

p. 51 Munivar mahadan avase - Imâm Shâh

p. 53 Sat pañth esâ kari sreviye - Imâm Shâh

p. 55 Sacho jano ne pîr pichano - Imâm Shâh

p. 57 Lobh savar ke jug vâpio - Imâm Shâh

p. 60 Pîr te dhiâvo tame sat nâ choro - Imâm Shâh

p. 63 Jiv ni chiñt have karo - Imâm Shâh

p. 71 Moman mahâdan avase - Imâm Shâh

p. 1 Nav Chugâ - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 1 Farmâns Sultân Muhammad Shâh June 2, 1900 n.p.

p. 48 Farmân November 1, [no year], Jangbar

p. 120 Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh date difficult to read n.p.

Remarks: ms gives descriptive titles for various ginâns

p. 1 Vishav kuvari nâ vivâ - Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 38 Mulband jo Achodo - Pîr Shams

p. 85 Uth jâg man merâ - Imâm Begum

p. 87 Tum chet man merâ - Imâm Begum

p. 88 Marnâ hai re jarur - Imâm Begum

p. 89 Darshan dio morâ nâth - Imâm Begum

p. 90 Sat gur miliâ mune âj - Imâm Begum

p. 92 Har dam karo abhiâs - Imâm Begum

p. 93 Har dam dariye dhyân - Imâm Begum

p. 94 Sejdie sutâ re râjâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (47 verses)

p. 98 Hete su milo mârâ munivar - Imâm Shâh

p. 100 Partham gur nar sreviye - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 101 Suno suno bhâive momano - Pîr Shams

p. 104 Sañbhalo momano ved ni vat - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 105 Sâmi âpohi âp - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (Nano Das Avatâr)

p. 108 Pâcham dise jañko khañd irâk - Pîr Shams (unpublished)

p. 111 Nave avatâre shâh nav danav - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 112 Jire bhâire desh delam me shâh jagayâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 113 Sâhebe bhanâ jene sab jug - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 118 Âsh puni ham - Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 120 Pâchame ayâ shâh partak payâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 122 Chogadio - Ji tu lal sirie sarandar âsâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 125 Âshaji tri tri lok - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 127 Yarâ vire jiu umedu âsu puniyu - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 128 Ahi kareo moman man dhirore - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 129 Srevo srevo momano - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 130 Pahelo pahelo nâmji - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 131 Pindhat te je e kisi - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 132 Jene ghatie shâhke khade - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 135 Hañs puri nagari mahe - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 136 Dul dul ghodo sâcho sâmi râjo chadse - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 141 Gat lokâjie umâyo shâm - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 143 Eji pir imâm shâh ginân boliyâ - Imâm Shâh

p. 145 Jire bhâire jugâ jug shâh avatâreâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 151 Jirebhâi zulfikâr kharañg lese shâh hâth - Imâm Shâh

p. 152 Mahe varse amrat nur ke (garbi 6) - Pîr Shams

p. 154 Tame ramjo din ne rât ke (garbi 7) - Pîr Shams

p. 155 Tame jañpajo din ne rât (garbi 8) - Pîr Shams

p. 157 Avâ gur nar sâmine - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 158 Nar pâchame thi charengo - Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 160 Apane jene sirajiyâ tene varajoji - Imâm Shâh

p. 162 Sum nahi tuñ jâg saverâ - Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 214 Ame janie sâmi sunkar mâñhe - Imâm Shâh (unpublished)

p. 215 Nahi hotâ chandâ nahi hotâ suraj - Imâm Shâh

p. 215 Same râjo âve, jave teni sudh nâ pâve - Imâm Shâh

p. 216 Nar akhar nar har chhe - Imâm Shâh (unpublished)

Date: last page says "Badar 1, [?] Samvat"

Colophon: Last page says "Dhali Alâdin Gulâm - Gulâm Husayn Press"

p. 1 Epistles of Imâm Jacfar al-Sâdiq

p. 46 Farmân Imâm Hasan Sindhi

p. 47 Moman Chetâmani - Imâm Shâh (630 verses)

p. 115 Anañt Akhado - Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (500 verses)

p. 161 Saloko Niñdo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (119 verses)

p. 171 Saloko Vado - Pîr Shams (241 verses)

Date: page one says "Asad Sud 8, 1940 Samvat," page 42 says "1040

p. 1 Sentar dip me shâh - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 19 Ajab Dariyâ (Persian - the Ocean of Mystery)

p. 33 Hadith nabawi - includes several hadith qudsi written in Arabic but with Khojki script

f. 1 Ginân by Pîr Sadr al-Dîn - title is missing

f. 2 Ghar sar vadhayu - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 33 Virâ bhâi din hakikati daem dil mahe - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 34 Dañdukar ni sâth marije - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 36 Jugme fire shâh ji muneri - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 38 Âshâji sacho to alakh niriñjan - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 41 Namo te shâh nur khe jo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (jodilo)

f. 44 Bhâi tini virejiu - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (jodilo)

f. 46 Kâchi kâyâ mitaki - Sayyid Fazal Shâh

f. 49 Pâcham dis jâko thiñdo irâk - Pîr Shams (unpublished)

f. 54 Pâcham desh thi prabhu padhâryâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 58 Sambhalo moman ved ni vat - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 60 Uth beth bañdâ tu kae suto - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 65 Jire virâ huñ balihâri gur âpane - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 67 Ek shabad suno mere bhâi - Pîr Shams

f. 71 Âpanu âp pichâno - Sayyid Imâm Shâh (jodilo)

f. 73 Bhamar gufâ upar nur hai - Sayyid Muhammad Shâh (jodilo)

f. 82 Sahi srevo mâ dhil kar - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 87 Asmani tambal vajiâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

Date: folio 18 indicates that the ms was written Jeth 16, 1910 Samvat

f. 3 Du'âs of Adam and other prophets, may be translations of Imâm Zayn al-cAbidîn's Sahîfa

f. 10 Jiv tu javâ deh ande sañsâr nu savad - Pîr Shams

f. 13 Pîr shams chaliyâ chatur deshane - Pîr Shams (jodilo,

f. 16 Part of a ginân written sideways

f. 17 Ghar Sarva dhâyu shâh more - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 18 Muman Chitveni - Sayyid Imâm Shâh (321 verses)

f. 101 Athsadam chalitrâ chakhte - Sri Gurumo Nâmâ Desi (?)

f. 160 Châr gadi kâ châr jug kiyâ - Pîr Shams (prabhati)

f. 162 Ek dandukar fir dujâ hoveñgâ [?]

Colophon: Page 2 says "Ramzan cAlî," folio 110 says "H.J. Damani,

Badarvâ Sud 4, 1993 Samvat, Rajab 4, 1355 AH, September 21, 1938 CE"

f. 4 Allah ek kasam - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 6 Ash tamari shri ho kâyam sâmi - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 9 Kasini didhi virâ sat saherku - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 10 Partham gurnar srevie - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 12 Ginân bolore nit nure bhariâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 14 Tajio sañg ku sañg - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 16 Jug mâñhe srevâ sisi kire ho - Sayyid Imâm Shâh (unpublished)

f. 17 Sat gur miliâ mune âj - Imâm Begum

f. 18 Har dam jañpo pir shâh nu jâñp - Imâm Begum

f. 18 Marnâ hai re jarur - Imâm Begum

f. 19 Darshan dio morâ nâth dâsi chhu - Imâm Begum

f. 20 Sat gur sâthe gothadi kije - Satgur Nur

f. 21 Huñ balhâri gur âpane - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 23 Tañku sadare so dîn - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 25 Sâmi rajo ave jañgi dol vajâve - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 26 Sarag bhavanthi bhâi mati mangâi - Sayyid Fazal Shâh

f. 27 Partak vilodîne fañs - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 29 Surjâ râni em uchare - Pîr Shams

f. 32 Har pouch niravân - Pîr Shams

f. 33 Is duniyâ de vich - Pîr Shams

f. 34 Rukh mugat rayjine shiâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (unpublished)

f. 36 Karshan boltâ te añbar - Imâm Shâh (unpublished)

f. 37 Sâheb badâ jen re sab jug sirajyâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 38 Hasi kije virâ har tani - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 43 Munivar mahâdan âvashe - Imâm Shâh

f. 46 Avâ gur nar sâmi ne srevie - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 47 Unchâre kot bahu vechanâ - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 48 Bhorâ re bhorâ mânvi - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 49 Roj kiyâmat dâdo âvashe - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 49 Sat gur srevo tame madhrâte jâgo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 50 Jamin âsaman sâhebe jugat jariâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 51 Dharmi te je virâ dharam vichârâ - Imâm Shâh

f. 53 Prem pâtan râjâ mansud (moto) - Pîr Shams (99 verses)

f. 61 Sat tane mukh mâr nâ hove - Sayyid Kutubdîn

f. 64 Bhayre bhar mâ tano yar mâ boleo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 66 Sambhalo moman ved ni vât - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 67 A ghat sâs usâs niriñjan - Pîr Satgur Nur

f. 69 More âshâ ji harovar sarovar - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 70 Kahet surjâne sâmbhalo putrâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 71 Sachâ re sâhiyâ ku nishadîn srevo - Mirâ Sayyid Khan

f. 75 Ajab zamânâ suno moman bhâi - Pîr Shams

f. 76 Turie bhi turie sacho - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 79 Sutak pâtak gat mañhe khoto - Imâm Shâh

f. 80 Hajar gur nar janjo - Pîr Shams

f. 81 Gur parmani tame sevâ jano - Sayyid Imâm Shâh

f. 83 Satpanth sachâ ne gurji ni vachâ - Sayyid Imâm Shâh

f. 85 Âd unad jo satgur sarjeâ - Imâm Shâh

f. 86 Ajab ajaib dekho moman bhâi - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 87 Ho jire marâ hansâ karani kamavo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 88 Kaljug aviyâ utavaro - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 90 Shri islam shâh amne malyâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 91 Karani kamavo marâ munivaro - Imâm Shâh

f. 93 Dharam kartâ âras na karie - Imâm Shâh

f. 94 Lavo to ahi lorinyo - Pîr Shams

f. 95 Lavo lavo ghañs bandhavo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 96 Ke râjâ pandave te meli jare prathvi - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 97 Sâmi rajo more manthi nâ visareji - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 98 Sachalo marag sâmijie sirjiâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 100 Ho jir prani jare tu girbhâ than vasanto - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 101 Âd unade ahunkar upanâ - Imâm Shâh

f. 102 Dil nâ dagâ bande - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 103 Dehi gur ke vachâ - Pîr Tâj al-Dîn

f. 104 Dul dul ghode ali charse - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 105 Jisre gurku ham arâ so - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (unpublished)

f. 106 Hañs puri nagri mahe - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 107 Uth jag man merâ tu kay ku sotâ hai - Imâm Begum

f. 109 Tum chet man merâ - Imâm Begum

f. 111 Nar naklañki keri vat - Sayyid Fateh cAlî Shâh

f. 112 Das Avatâr part 10 - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 115 Sahentar dipme shâh - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 116 Jaher dev jampu dipmâ betâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 118 Âsh puni ham shâh dar payâ - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 1 Manhar - Sayyid Gulâm cAlî Shâh

Date: Written 18?? (last two numbers obscure, maybe 1883?)

Remarks: folios 11, 23 or 24, and 119-130 are missing

f. 1 Du'â (Silsila ends with Agâ Hasan cAlî Shâh)

f. 14 Jug me fire shâh ji - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 15 Sacho tu alakh nirinjan - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 16 Jire bhâire namo te narayan kajo sri kan - Pîr

f. 18 Kayam âyâ shâh ji anant - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 18 Bhâi tini virejiu umedu asu puniu - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 19 Shâh ke hek man ahi srevo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 22 Eji anant konie vadaiu - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (unpublished)

f. 23 Manhar - Sayyid Gulâm cAlî Shâh (56 verses)

f. 67 miscellaneous poetry

Remarks: most pages are cut off, starts on folio 8

f. 8 50 verse grañth by Imâm Shâh, might be Jannat Puri

f. 30 Story about Prophet Muhammad and Imâm Husayn

Date: page 163 and last page give 1927 Samvat (1871 CE)

Remarks: many sections of this ms are written in Arabic script

p. 9 Pandavano Parab - Sayyid Imâm Shâh (582 verses)

p. 64 Mag chudi momane marag lasho - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 68 Pîr Shams jo das avatâr - Pîr Shams (unpublished)

p. 71 Qayam mahdi rah hasedâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 73 Yarâ shafayat muhammad karse - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 74 Hove hove ji sachâ paye chalo -

p. 78 Yâ khudavind anat kalap - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 85 Jyare tu girbhâ than vasato - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 87 Sat tane mukh mar nâ hove - Pîr Kutubdîn

p. 89 Jire e yarâ je kario te âp murad - Pîr Shams

p. 91 Marâ munivar bhâi desh uttar thinde - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 93 Bhâim mominoji avine beso amiras piyo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 95 Is duniyâ tu bhul kem jave - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 97 Âshaji ape allah ape nirinjan - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 139 Satgur nur nâ putlâ - Sat Gur Nûr (223 verses)

p. 163 Gugri jâ ginâno - Sayyid Imâm Shâh (64 verses)

p. 171 Rukhi mugat rae ji es huâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (unpublished)

p. 174 Dharam ladho lahine fulane - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 177 Desh delam te shâh ayâ -

p. 179 Jago re satpanthi virâ bhâi - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 182 Hu balhari gur apano - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 184 Avâ gurnar sâmine - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 185 Bhalere bhâi tame kar liyo kamay - Sayyid Muhammad Shâh

p. 186 Sam sadhaji sacho shâh - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 187 Pahelo re nam mavlâ jo lije - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

p. 188 Paye te ayâ shâh partak payâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

Date: page 1 says Mag 20, 1935 Samvat

Remarks: starts numbering by pages then by folios in English, there is an unnumbered folio betveen 14 and 15

p. 1 Lavo lavo ghañs bandavo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

p. 2 Dandukar ni sankh marije

f. 3 Sahbharo momano ved ni vat

f. 4 Ginân by Pîr Sadr al-Dîn - title undecipherable

f. 6 Eji roj kiyamat dado âvase - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 7 Mal khajinâ bohotaj bhariâ - Sayyid Ghulam cAlî Shâh

f. 8 Turiye bi turye sacho sâmi rajo chadse - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 8 Tadu tadu mithadu bolo

f. 9 Chillâ chodi dînkâ - Sayyid Muhammad Shâh

f. 10 Prem patan râjâ mansud - Pîr Shams

f. 11 Eji doe benâ hoe nivenâ -

f. 11 Ek shabd suno morâ bhâi -

f. 12 Ek virâ maran - Indrâ Imâm Dîn (unpublished)

f. 13 Hete su milo marâ munivar - Imâm Shâh

f. 14 Sâhebe farmân lakhi mokalyâ - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 14 1/2 (unnumbered) Hete su milo marâ munivar - Imâm Shâh

f. 16 Eji hete mine sate chalajo - Imâm Shâh (jodilo)

f. 20 Eji asât tari sri - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (unpublished)

f. 21 Venti karuñ chhuñ - Sayyid Abdul Nabi

f. 23 Dhir dhiro momano - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 24 Dharam murat ahelâ gur bhirmâ pichano - Pîr Hasan

f. 26 Jire bhâi sat jugmae - Imâm Shâh (unpublished)

f. 27 Jire bhâi tretâ jugmae - Imâm Shâh (jodilo)

f. 28 Jire bhâi dvapur jug mae - Imâm Shâh (jodilo)

f. 29 Jire bhâi dhakan dise shâhnu thanak ratcho - Imâm Shâh

f. 30 Jire bhâi nakalank narayan makhato - Imâm Shâh

f. 31 Chandrabhan and Vel (Pahelâ nâm allah kâ lije) - Pîr

f. 60 Pacham deshthi prabhu padhariyâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 63 Hu balihari gur apane - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 65 Ginân of Pîr Sadr al-Dîn - title undecipherable

f. 65 Dul dul ghodo sacho sâmi rajo chadse - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 69 Thar thar moman bhâi - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 71-72 Khojkî letters (probably the work of a child)

p. 7 Sajni samajonere samjo (poem)

p. 18 Si Harfi - Sayyid Ahmad Shâh

p. 39 Lilapeli khetar paji

Remarks: pages are unnumbered

p. Kalâme Maulâ - attributed to Pîr Shams [sic, !]

Remarks: last two pages are at the front

f. 38 Anañt Akhado - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 138 Saloko - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (119 verses)

f. 159 Satvani Vadi - Pîr Imâm Shâh (22 chugas)

f. 190 Âp murâd manade - Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn

f. 193 Suno suno bhâive momano, esâ kaljug ayeâ - Pîr Shams

f. 195 Huñ re piyâsi piyâ tere darshanki - Mirâ Sayyid Khan

f. 200 Is duniyâ tu bhuli kem jave - Pîr Hasan Kabardîn

f. 204 Avâ gurnar sâmine - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 205 Âpano ap pichano - Imâm Shâh

f. 207 Tajio sang ku sang - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 209 Sab ghat sâheb rajo barpur bethâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 212 Jire virâ hu balihari gur âpane - Pîr Hasan Kabîr al-Dîn (unpublished)

f. 215 Sâmi tamari vadi mahe - Pîr Shams

f. 217 Satgur bhetiâ kem janie - Pîr Shams

f. 219 Sam sadaji sacho sam sadaji - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 220 Par fatine nir ultiâ - Pîr Shams

f. 225 Sarag bhavanthi mati mangai - Sayyid Fazal Shâh

f. 226 Sacho tuhi moro sahiâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn (unpublished)

f. 228 Amar te ayo - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 231 Pacham deshthi prabhu padharyâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 234 Avâ gur nar sâmi su het - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 235 Uth beth bandâ tu kahi sutâ - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 240 Vâvso tevu lunso - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

f. 241 Jyare tu girbhâ than vasanto - Pîr Sadr al-Dîn

Date: page 1 gives "Mag 27, 1975 Samvat" page 141 gives "Fag, 1975 Samvat"

Colophon: on page 347 - undecipherable

p. 1 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh 1928 Samvat

p. 141 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh 1928 Samvat

p. 172 Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh

p. 176 Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh Pos (15 or 16), 1957 Samvat Guadar

p. 188 Farmân Sultân Muhammad Shâh Badar, 1961 Samvat (copied from printed Lâljî Devrâj Book)

p. 208 Farmân Agâ cAlî Shâh copied from a book by Alijâh Mukhi Datu bhâi


1908: The Year the Airplane Went Public

The honor is indisputably theirs: Wilbur and Orville Wright made the first powered, sustained, controlled, heavier-than-air flights at Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina on December 17, 1903.

From This Story

Video: Wright B Over Manhattan, 1912

Video: Teddy Roosevelt Goes Flying

Video: A Dash Through the Clouds, 1912

Henry Farman flying his Voisin Farman I in a one-kilometer circle to win the Deutsche-Archdeacon prize in Paris, January 13, 1908. Members of the Aero Club de France wave their hats. (NASM (SI 89-19606)) July 4, 1908: Glenn Curtiss and his June Bug win the Scientific American trophy for a flight of almost a mile at Hammondsport, New York. (NASM A-516-A) Wilbur Wright seated in his Wright Type A at the Hunaudieres race course near Le Mans, France, August, 1908. (NASM (2003-29080)) Flight trials over LeMans, France, in August 1908, with Wilbur Wright at the controls. (NASM (SI 86-13505)) Wilbur Wright (right) gets help disassembling his Wright Type A after a flight at LeMans, France, August 13, 1908. (NASM (SI 93-7193)) Crowds gathered for one of Wilbur Wright’s 1908 flights over LeMans, France. (NASM (SI 76-1300)) Orville Wright flies over Fort Myer, Virginia during Army trials, September 9, 1908. (USAF) At Fort Myer, Virginia, the son of photographer Carl H. Claudy, Sr. watches the Wright Military Flyer during Army trials in the summer of 1908. (NASM (SI 85-10846)) Orville Wright flying over Fort Myer, Virginia, during U.S. Army Trials, summer 1908. (NASM (SI 95-8963)) A reproduction of the Wright 1908 Model A -- the airplane that Orville Wright demonstrated to the U.S. Army at Fort Myer, Virginia -- will be on display Saturday, September 6, 2008 at the Centennial of Military Aviation celebration in Arlington, Virginia. For details, visit www.wrightexperience.com. (Paul Glenshaw)

Photo Gallery

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But even though they had succeeded, the Wrights recognized that they had a considerable distance to go before they could claim to have developed a practical flying machine. So they continued their work in a Dayton cow pasture in 1904 and 1905. By the fall of 1905, they had transformed the marginal success of 1903 into the reality of a practical airplane capable of traveling many miles through the air and remaining aloft for more than an hour at a time. The Wrights worried about being copied, though. Unwilling to unveil their creation without the protection of a patent and a signed sales contract, the brothers remained on the ground for the next two and a half years as they attempted to market their invention.

So it was that as 1908 dawned, almost no one realized that the age of winged flight had been under way for more than four years. That was about to change. With contracts for the sale of airplanes to a French syndicate and the U.S. Army finally in hand, the Wrights were ready to take to the air once again that spring. They returned to the Kill Devil Hills with a rebuilt version of their 1905 airplane—now modified with upright seating and controls, and a second seat for a passenger. On May 14, 1908, Wilbur and Orville alternated taking Charles Furnas, one of their mechanics, up as the world’s first airplane passenger.

While the Wrights prepared for their first public flights, other experimenters took to the air, often with crowds watching in amazement. On January 13, 1908, Henry Farman flew his Voisin Farman I in a one-kilometer circle to win the 50,000-franc Deutsche-Archdeacon prize. It was a big spring for the Aerial Experiment Association, as well. Founded by Alexander Graham Bell, the AEA included a pair of young Canadian enthusiasts, Frederick W. “Casey” Baldwin and J.A.D. McCurdy, along with two Americans, Lt. Thomas Selfridge of the U.S. Army and Glenn Hammond Curtiss. The AEA built and flew a series of three aircraft that spring and summer, culminating in Curtiss’s flight aboard the biplane June Bug at Hammondsport on July 4, 1908. Covering almost a mile in one minute 42.5 seconds, the achievement earned the group the Scientific American Trophy. Later that summer, Curtiss traveled to Fort Myer, Virginia, where he flew with Captain T.S. Baldwin aboard the hydrogen-filled dirigible airship SC-1, which was purchased by the Army.

The excitement peaked on August 8, 1908, when Wilbur Wright made his first flight in public at the Hunaudieres race course, five miles south of Le Mans, France. Over the next several weeks he made headlines around the world with one stunning flight after another—demonstrating once and for all that the Wrights’ claim to priority in the invention of the airplane was true (there had been skeptics), and that their airplanes were capable of tight turns and a degree of control impossible with other machines.

Orville Wright joined his brother in the limelight on September 3, 1908, when he made his first public flight at Fort Myer. Like Wilbur, he continued to fly over the next two weeks, carrying passengers and meeting criteria established by the Army for the purchase of an airplane. Tragedy struck on September 17, when Orville crashed at Fort Myer while flying with Selfridge, who became the first person to die in a powered airplane crash. Orville recovered, but lived with the pain resulting from the accident for the rest of his life.

The momentous year was far from over. On October 16, the American Samuel Franklin Cowdery (aka S.F. Cody) made the first flight in Great Britain. Once Orville Wright was back on his feet, he and his sister Katharine joined their brother in Europe. The three Wrights were now the toast of the continent. Crowned heads, political leaders, captains of industry and ordinary folk traveled to witness the miracle of flight. Wilbur capped this extraordinary year with a flight of more than 76 miles in 2 hours 18 minutes 33 3/5ths seconds on December 31, which earned him the Michelin Cup and a 20,000 franc cash prize for the best flight of 1908.

By year’s end, no skeptic doubted that the age of flight had arrived, and that the Wrights were leading the way.

Tom D. Crouch is a Wright biographer and senior curator in the aeronautics division of the National Air and Space Museum. His books include The Bishop’s Boys: A Life of Wilbur and Orville Wright.

About Tom Crouch

Tom Crouch is a senior curator in the National Air and Space Museum’s aeronautics department. An historian of early flight, he is the author of The Bishop’s Boys: A Life of Wilbur and Orville Wright.


A century of history

Our company is a respectable lady of over 100 years old, a fact we are very proud of. It was created in 1908 by two global aviation pioneers: Henri and Maurice FARMAN.
After half a century of aeronautical adventures, which came to an end in 1956, the company redirected its efforts towards its long-term partner, the supplier of its aircraft engines: RENAULT.
Since then, FARMAN pursues its industrial adventure by producing robotised assembly lines and accumulation conveyors all around the world, for the aviation and automotive industries.

1874 Birth of Henri FARMAN
1877 Birth of Maurice FARMAN
1907 Creation of the FARMAN aviation workshops at Issy les Moulineaux
1908
13th of January : first manned flight on closed km by H FARMAN
30th of October: first intercity flight from Mourmelon to Reims
Creation of the Henri Farman workshops in BOUY (51)
Creation of the Maurice Farman workshops in BUC (78)
1910 Shared FARMAN brothers factory in Boulogne Billancourt
1920 The Société Générale de Transport Aérien (SGTA) integrates the Farman production line
1924 La FARMAN A6B
1921 à 1932 The Farman brothers start building luxury cars

1938 Creation of the Société Commerciale d’Aviation (SCA) by M. FAMRAN and his son Marcel
1941 Creation of SAUF (Société Anonyme des Usines Farman) in Billancourt then in Suresnes
1944 Nationalisation and integration of SAUF in SNCASO
1952 SAUF is re-launched by Marcel FARMAN in Toussus le Noble, its efforts directed towards the production of aviation and automotive tools

1956 Dissolution of SCA.
The Farman production line produces its last aircraft.
1958 Death of Henri FARMAN
1960 SAUF creates a subsidiary:
the Société Générale de Mécanique et de Tôlerie in TOURS (37)
1964 Death of Maurice FARMAN
1976 Closure of the FARMAN factory in Billancourt and creation of the Ateliers Mécaniques de Dreux (AMD), opening of a Research Centre in St CLOUD.
1980 Closure of AMD, transfer of industrial operations to TOURS
1988 Marcel FARMAN leaves the management of SAUF and is replaced by his son Patrick, who becomes CEO
1989 SAUF acquires the Société Tourangelle d’entreprises Electriques (STEE), supplier of its electrical equipments for the past 20 years
1996 SAUF is sold to German group IWKA
1997 Merger of three companies, FARMAN, AMD and SGMT under the name of FARMAN
1998 FARMAN acquires GECOM in Plaisirs (78)
2005 Opening of a Research Centre in CLUJ NAPOCA (Romania)

Patrick FARMAN leaves FARMAN’s management
2006 The TOURS activities are grouped under FARMAN Industries
2007 IWKA becomes KUKA
FARMAN Industries and SAUF go under the control of KUKA and become KUKA SYSTEM France
2009 KUKA sells KUKA SYSTEMS France to German group ARS and returns to the name of FARMAN SYSTEMS
2013 The Bourguignon-based Group GALILE acquires FARMAN SYSTEMS and renames it FARMAN


History

Androw was a failed squire in his youth, possessing no skill at arms. ΐ] His father had considered sending him to Oldtown to become a maester, until his own maester told him that Androw was simply not clever enough. ΐ]

From 43–47 AC, Marq Farman hosted Princess Rhaena Targaryen on Fair Isle. Rhaena and Androw reportedly grew more than fond of each other during the princess's stay at Faircastle. Α] They married in 49 AC, during the reign of King Jaehaerys I Targaryen, in a quick and small ceremony. Lord Marq presided over the wedding, and Lord Lyman Lannister, his wife, Lady Jocasta, and two of Rhaena's friends, Samantha Stokeworth and Alayne Royce, attended the wedding. Rhaena was twenty-six and twice widowed, and Androw seventeen. He was said to be utterly besotted with his new wife. Β]

As the second son of a minor lord, Androw was not considered particularly worthy of a former queen and the mother of the king's heir. Β] When asked why she had chosen such an unpromising husband, Rhaena replied that he had been kind to her. ΐ] Some wondered if perhaps Rhaena married Androw to repay Marq Farman for his kindnesses in sheltering her from King Maegor I Targaryen, for Lord Farman was fond of his son. However, Lord Farman's maester, Smike, speculated that the princess had wed Androw not because she loved him, but because she had fallen in love with his sister Elissa. Elissa, Rhaena, and Rhaena's other companions Alayne Royce and Samantha Stokeworth were very close, to the point they were called "the Four-Headed Beast". Rhaena would frequently take her ladies flying on the back of her dragon Dreamfyre. Though Androw was admitted within their circle, he was never considered a fifth head, and never went flying with Rhaena. It is possible that Rhaena offered, but Androw was not adventurous enough to agree. ΐ]

There were tensions between the couple and Androw's brother Ser Franklyn Farman. A fortnight after Rhaena and Androw's first anniversary in 50 AC, Marq Farman died, and Franklyn became Lord of Fair Isle. He immediately commanded Androw and Rhaena to leave Fair Isle, but leave Elissa behind. Androw, angered, offered to face his brother in single combat, but Rhaena gently dissuaded him, saying he was no match for Franklyn and she did not wish to be widowed again. Rhaena, Androw, and Elissa fled the island for Casterly Rock, along with Rhaena's entourage. At Casterly Rock, while Lord Lyman Lannister and his wife Jocasta were openly hospitable, it became apparent they were being spied upon. A castle septa asked if the marriage had ever been consummated, and who had witnessed the bedding. Ser Tyler Hill, Lyman's bastard son, was openly scornful of Androw and tried to charm Rhaena. The Lannisters also suggested a way to repay them would be to give them one of Dreamfyre's eggs. ΐ]

Rhaena and her court took their leave of Casterly Rock and traveled the westerlands and riverlands, where Androw found himself forgotten and ignored by their hosts, and Rhaena found they all feared Dreamfyre or desired her eggs. In 51 AC, Rhaena visited King's Landing to attend the second wedding of her siblings King Jaehaerys and Queen Alysanne, and explained her difficulties. She was eventually granted Dragonstone as her own seat. Γ]

However, on Dragonstone, Androw found life to be no better. Rhaena was called the "Queen in the East", but nobody considered him a king, or even a lord consort. He sat at his wife's side at meals but did not share her bed that honor went to her companions and favorites. They slept apart in different towers, and though the gossip at Dragonstone was that his wife told him he should find a pretty maid to share his bed, he never did. Having no skill at arms, he would remain abed while knights trained in the yard. He could neither read nor write, so could not enjoy the Dragonstone library. Though Androw could ride a horse passably well, and would trot around the yard, he was too timid to leave the castle to explore the island. Men at Dragonstone paid him no mind the ladies laughed at him behind his back servants sometimes ignored his commands. Children taunted him, the cruelest being his step-daughter Aerea Targaryen, who once threw the contents of a chamberpot over his head just because she was angry at her mother. Androw drank a great deal, and was known to spend whole days in the Chamber of the Painted Table, moving painted wooden soldiers around the map. Rhaena's companions would joke that he was planning his conquest of Westeros. Ώ]

Androw's loneliness and discontent only grew worse after his sister Elissa Farman fled Dragonstone in 54 AC, as she had been his closest friend, perhaps his only friend. When it was later discovered Elissa had stolen three dragon eggs from the Dragonstone hatcheries, Rhaena summoned Androw and furiously demanded to know if he knew anything about his sister's betrayal. His tearful denials only enraged Rhaena further, and she found it hard to believe he had played no role in the crime. Androw offered to accompany her to see King Jaehaerys at King's Landing to report the theft of the eggs, but she scornfully refused, saying he was incapable of anything but falling off the dragon. After the theft, Rhaena dismissed Ser Merrell Bullock, and Androw asked her to make him the new commander of the garrison in his place. She and her ladies burst out laughing at the request. Ώ]

When news arrived that Rhaena's mother's health was failing, Androw announced he would accompany Rhaena to Storm's End so he could comfort her, as a husband should. Rhaena refused his offer as she had before, and not gently. A loud argument preceded her departure. By the time Rhaena returned from her mother's deathbed, Androw no longer had any desire to comfort her. The marriage between the two, though never passionate, became loveless. Alayne Royce called it a mummer's farce, "and not an entertaining one." Sullen and cold, Androw sat silent at meals and avoided his wife's company. Rhaena was not bothered by his sulks, finding comfort in her ladies instead, both old and new. Ώ]

At the end of 54 AC, a mysterious epidemic came to Dragonstone. The elderly Maester Culiper was the first to die, followed by Rhaena's ladies Cassella Staunton, Septa Maryam, Alayne Royce, and Samantha Stokeworth. Aside from Culiper, the disease only killed women, striking down Rhaena's friends and dear companions. The castle closed its gates to protect others, and the royal fleet quarantined the island. When Rhaena's young cousin Lianna Velaryon died in her arms, Andrew saw her weeping and asked if she would weep for him the same way. Rhaena struck him across the face and told him to leave her, as she wished to be alone. He replied that she would be, as Lianna was the last of them. Ώ]

When King Jaehaerys and his small council discussed the epidemic, Lord Rego Draz recognized the symptoms as those of poison, the tears of Lys. As soon as Rhaena read the message from King's Landing, she knew that the poisoner was Androw. Her guards tried to find him within the castle, and discovered Maester Anselm, stabbed in the back with a dagger. Androw was finally tracked down within the Chamber of the Painted Table, where he confessed to Rhaena that he had been jealous of her friendships with her ladies and tired of their mockery, and frustrated that he had never been seen as a true husband to her. Rhaena did not reply, but ordered her guards that he be gelded, and his penis and testicles fed to him. Androw leaped from the room's window, denying her revenge. Rhaena had his body cut into pieces and fed to her dragons. Afterwards, just the mention of his name would provoke her to fits of rage. Ώ]


Farman F.212 - History

The Center for Jewish History and its partner organizations - The American Jewish Historical Society, The American Sephardi Federation, The Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research - protest the recent trial in Poland of the eminent scholars, Barbara Engelking and Jan Grabowski. This trial is the most visible outcome of recent measures undertaken by some Polish authorities to suppress scholarly inquiry and threatens to exert a chilling effect on future research and publication in Poland. All who believe that independent, unbiased scholarship is an essential element of a free society should be alarmed at this troubling assault on academic freedom.

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Farman F.212 - History



























1910 Chronology of Aviation History
Major Aviation Events

1910 Aviation Records

Speed: 68.2-mph, Alfred Leblanc, Blériot XI, 29 October 1910, France

Distance: 363.34-miles, Maurice Tabuteau, Maurice Farman, 30 December 1910, France

Altitude: 10,170-feet, Georges Legagneux, Blériot, 8 December 1910, France

Weight: 2,950-lbs, Samuel Cody, Cody Michelin Cup

Engine Power: 177-hp, Clerget, Double Clerget 4W, France

1910 &mdash First night flights.

1910 &mdash Races between aeroplanes and cars are only won by racing cars.

January &mdash First International Air Races in America. Held at Los Angeles.

January 4 &mdash Leon Delagrange is killed at Pau after wings on Blériot collapse.

January 7 &mdash Frenchman Hubert Latham is the first pilot to climb to 1000 meters.

March 1 &mdash Châlons, France &hellip Henry Farman made the first officially ratified night flight. Farman did this aboard a flying machine garlanded with Chinese paper lanterns attached to the tips of the wings to help him keep his bearings.

March 8 &mdash Paris, France &hellip Frenchwoman Baroness Raymonde de Laroche became the first certificated woman pilot in the world.

March 10 &mdash Emil Aubrun makes the first night flights, in a Blériot Type IX at Villalugano, Argentina.

March 13 &mdash Paul Engelhard makes the first flight in Switzerland, flying a Wright biplane from a frozen lake at St Moritz

March 14 &mdash Louis Paulhan flies 146 km in a straight route from Orleans to Trois.

March 28 &mdash Martigues, France &hellip On this date, for the first time, an airplane took off from water. At the controls of his powered seaplane, the Canard, was Henri Fabre, a 28-year old engineer from Marseilles. This was Fabre's first flight. The flight took place at Lake Berre near Martigues on the Mediterranean.

June 2 &mdash Charles Rolls makes the first successful return flight over the English Channel

June 17 &mdash Romanian engineer and inventor Aurel Vlaicu flies his first airplane, Vlaicu I

July 5 &mdash Bert Pither is reputed to have flown the first metal-framed aircraft at Riverton, New Zealand

July 9 &mdash Frenchman Léon Morane sets a new speed record of 106 km/h.

July 12 &mdash Charles Rolls is killed in a crash at Bournemouth, becoming the first British aviation fatality

September 1910

September 6 &mdash Blanche Stuart Scott makes the first solo airplane flight by a woman in the United States subsequently recognized by the Early Birds of Aviation.

September 10 &mdash Hampshire, England &hellip On this date, Englishman Geoffrey de Havilland, flew his first successful aircraft, de Havilland Nº 2 biplane.

September 11 &mdash Dublin, Ireland &hellip First crossing of the Irish Sea, from Hollyhead, Wales to Dublin, Ireland was made by Robert Loraine in a Farman biplane.

September 16 &mdash Bessica Raiche makes the first solo airplane flight by a woman in the United States to be accredited at the time by the Aeronautical Society of America.

September 23 &mdash French Alps &hellip Georges Chavez made the first aeroplane flight over the Alps in a Blériot monoplane. Tragically, on his final landing approach at about 30 feet, something snapped, and the aircraft fell to the ground. Chavez died several days later due to injuries from the crash.

October 1910

October &mdash Romanian inventor Henri Coanda (1886-1972), built the first thermojet prototype, named the Coanda-1910 he exhibited it at the International Aeronautic Salon in Paris, and tested it at the airport in Issy-les-Moulineaux.

October 2 &mdash The first mid-air collision takes place near Milan. Both pilots survive, but one is badly injured.

October 11 &mdash Theodore Roosevelt becomes the first man who served as U.S. President to fly in an airplane (term ended in 1909).

November 4 &mdash Welshman Ernest Willows makes the first airship crossing from England to France with Willows No. 3 City of Cardiff.

November 14 &mdash USS Birmingham &hellip Curtiss professional test pilot, Eugene Ely, made the first successful take-off from a ship, the light cruiser USS Birmingham. On this flight Ely flew a Curtiss Model D biplane.

December 1910

December 16 &mdash Henri Coanda's plane was the first jet to fly when unexpectedly was airborne when testing the engine.

December 21 &mdash Hélène Dutrieu became the first winner of the Coupe Femina (Femina Cup) for a non-stop flight of 167 kilometers in 2 hours 35 minutes

  1. Gunston, Bill, et al. Chronicle of Aviation. Liberty, Missouri: JL Publishing Inc., 1992. 14-17
  2. Parrish, Wayne W. (Publisher). "United States Chronology". 1962 Aerospace Yearbook, Forty-Third Annual Edition. Washington, DC: American Aviation Publications, Inc., 1962, 446-469.
  3. Wikipedia, 1910 in aviation
  4. Shupek, John (photos and card images), The Skytamer Archive. Skytamer.com, Whittier, CA

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ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


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